Tigers intentionally walk Jeff Francoeur in 10th, lose 8-3 to Royals

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It wasn’t the worst call of Jim Leyland’s life. It may not have even been the worst call he made today. But  Leyland opened the floodgates for a five-run 10th inning when he intentionally walked Jeff Francoeur in the 10th inning Thursday against the Royals. It was a 3-3 game at the time, but the Tigers went on to lose 8-3 after an Alex Gordon grand slam in the inning.

Francouer was walked by left-hander Phil Coke with one out and runners on second and third after a wild pitch. Coke had already walked a left-handed batter in the inning in Mike Moustakas and he went on to walk George Kottaras after the IBB, giving the Royals a one-run lead. Fellow lefty Darin Downs took over from there, and after getting a grounder to second that led to a forceout at home, he surrendered the slam to Gordon.

In truth, walking Francoeur there was a move a bunch of managers in Leyland’s position would have made. Francoeur has always hit lefties quite well. Even as lousy as he has been this season, he entered the day 7-for-18 against lefties, good for a .389 average. And on deck was a rusty left-handed hitting catcher with a career .194 average against lefties (Kottaras, who had taken over for Salvador Perez in the game, had just five plate appearances despite spending the whole season to date on the Royals’ roster). Coke’s entire reason for being is to retire left-handed batters, and if he could have gotten Kottaras for the second out, he had another set to hit in Chris Getz.

But this wasn’t Coke’s day. It is something that Leyland might have figured out during the walk to Moustakas, but if he was going to leave Coke in and not turn to a right-hander, then walking Francoeur was justified. Frankly, if I were going to blast Leyland about anything today, it’d be about giving yet another start to .118-hitting Don Kelly in left field.

Yankees get into esports, announce investment partnership with Vision Esports

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The Yankees have announced an investment partnership with Vision Esports. Vision Esports is the largest single shareholder of three esports-related companies, which includes Echo Fox, Twin Galaxies, and Vision Entertainment. The size of the investment was not disclosed.

Echo Fox was founded by former NBA player Rick Fox. The team has players from some of the most popular titles, including League of Legends, Call of Duty, Street Fighter, and Super Smash Bros.

Twin Galaxies tracks retro video game world records. Vision Entertainment creates esports content across various platforms.

This is not the first intersection of baseball and esports. Earlier this year, pitcher Trevor May joined esports team Luminosity. Other teams, particularly in the NBA, have gotten involved in esports. Last year, the Philadelphia 76ers acquired esports teams Dignitas and Apex.