Frank McCourt turned a $1.278 billion profit on the sale of the Dodgers

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That’s free and clear, after paying taxes and taking an offset for the debt assumed by the Dodgers’ new owners, reports Bill Shaikin of the L.A. Times.

We know this because he’s in court right now, trying to fight off a challenge from Jamie McCourt. Jamie is now trying to get a better deal than the one she walked away with when they settled their divorce. Her deal: $131 million, tax free.  She now claims that Frank committed fraud when they settled, misleading her as to the value of the team. Of course, at the time, most folks thought she was getting a pretty good deal, being able to walk away from what then appeared to be a doomed business. Which she helped doom.

As for Frank, I’m struggling to think of anyone who has done better financially while making so many dumb and questionable decisions while running a baseball team. It’s either a testament to how hard it is to go broke as a team owner or a testament to how naive I am about how capitalism works at its highest levels.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.