Florida legislature to spend $3.3 million a year to try to keep spring training in Florida

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In Florida, the spring training parks are spread out from one another, making travel a drag. The Florida legislature passed a budget yesterday which provides $3.3 million a year for spring training complex upgrades and construction. Including:

This incentive is aimed at helping pay for a proposed stadium that would be used by the Houston Astros and the Toronto Blue Jays in Palm Beach Gardens. The Astros currently train in Kissimmee while the Blue Jays train in Dunedin.

Houston is interesting. Moving from the NL Central to the AL West means that all of their division rivals train in Arizona now. You have to wonder if they wouldn’t want to eventually move to the Cactus League in order to take advantage of all the people who travel to see Texas, Anaheim, Oakland and Seattle.

The Jays have been in Dunedin since the beginning and Canada-to-Florida tourism is a pretty major thing. One wonders if they’d actually try to leave the state, incentives or no incentives. Right now Cleveland and Cincinnati are the farthest north/east teams which travel to Arizona each winter and they’ve historically been at the bottom of Cactus League attendance.

(thanks to Nathan R. for the heads up)

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.