Shin-Soo Choo is on a record-breaking hit by pitch pace

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While not in Carlos Quentin territory Shin-Soo Choo has always been hit by a lot of pitches, averaging 12 per 150 games for his nine-year career.

He (or at least the pitchers plunking him) have taken that to another level this season, as the Reds leadoff man has already been hit by nine pitches in 18 games. Obviously that leads baseball, but it also puts Choo on a record-shattering pace.

Choo sat out one game, so the Reds have actually played 19 times this year. Here are the all-time leaders in times hit by a pitch through 19 team games:

Shin-Soo Choo      2013     9
Chase Utley        2007     7
Prince Fielder     2010     7
Fernando Vina      2001     6
David Eckstein     2008     6
Craig Biggio       1995     6
Eddie Yost         1955     6
Nick Johnson       2002     6
Ron Hunt           1968     6
Bill Freehan       1967     6
Richard Hidalgo    2000     6

It would probably be impossible to keep up that pace without winding up on the disabled list, but so far it has helped Choo post a league-leading .523 on-base percentage. Hughie Jennings holds the singe-season hit by pitch record with 51 in 1896 and Ron Hunt got plunked 50 times in 1971, so Choo still has a long way to go. No player has been hit by 30 or more pitches since Craig Wilson in 2004.

Report: Yankees to promote Gleyber Torres

Yankees Torres Baseball
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Yankees top prospect Gleyber Torres will be promoted to the majors this weekend, per a report from Jack Curry of the YES Network. Torres was expected to make his debut earlier in the season, but his starting date was pushed back after he suffered a bout of back tightness last Monday. Now, however, it looks like he’s finally healthy enough to make an impact on a team that’s in sore need of an offensive boost. As of Saturday evening, the team has yet to officially confirm the move.

The 21-year-old infielder has made quite the impression in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre this spring, slashing .370/.415/.543 with five extra-base hits and 11 RBI in his first 53 plate appearances. Prior to the start of the 2018 season, he was ranked first overall in the Yankees’ system and fifth among the league’s best prospects (via MLB Pipeline). His numbers at the plate have been made all the more impressive by the fact that he’s only 10 months removed from Tommy John surgery on his non-throwing arm; neither the injury nor the lengthy recovery process seems to have had any detrimental effect on his game play this year.

While Torres appears most comfortable as a shortstop, he’s not expected to supplant Didi Gregorius in a starting role. Instead, it’s more likely that he’ll sub in at second and third base among the likes of Miguel Andujar, Neil Walker and Ronald Torreyes.