Settling the Score: Friday’s results

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Last night featured round one of what should be a compelling NL East battle between the Braves and Nationals. While the Nationals had the early advantage behind an excellent effort from Ross Detwiler, the Braves came roaring back in the late innings for an eventual 6-4 win in 10 innings.

After scoring one run in the seventh and eighth innings, the Braves evened things up in the ninth against Drew Storen, who was being asked to close with Rafael Soriano unavailable. The big blow of the inning was a wild throw by Ryan Zimmerman which sailed past second base and allowed two runs to score. The Braves pulled ahead in the 10th inning with a two-run homer by utility infielder Ramiro Pena. How’s that for unlikely heroes?

The Braves have now won seven straight games and currently own the best record in the majors at 9-1. Stephen Strasburg will try to get the Nationals back in the win column this afternoon while Tim Hudson is on the mound for Atlanta.

Your Friday box scores:

Giants 3, Cubs 4

White Sox 0, Indians 1

Reds 5, Pirates 6

Orioles 2, Yankees 5

Phillies 3, Marlins 1 (10 innings)

Blue Jays 8, Royals 4

Brewers 0, Cardinals 2

Astros 5, Angels 0

Dodgers 0, Diamondbacks 3

Tigers 3, Athletics 4 (12 innings)

Rockies 7, Padres 5

Mets 16, Twins 5

Rangers 1, Mariners 3

Rays/Red Sox – postponed

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.