What in the hell is Major League Baseball doing with Biogenesis?

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It was up late last night and was sort of overwhelmed by the Dodgers-Padres brawl, but in case you missed it, go read Matthew’s post about the latest in the Biogenesis business. The upshot:  Major League Baseball is reportedly paying an ex-Biogenesis employee for documents relating to the case.

Feature how this works: your employer goes to one of you health care providers, buys your medical records from them, reads them, and then uses that information to discipline you at work.  You cool with that? If you’re not, please explain to me how what MLB is reportedly doing here is in any way defensible.

Also: if MLB is so convinced that the lawsuit they filed is righteous and justifiable, why are they now circumventing it to get the documents in question?

At some point it would be cool if MLB actually made some sort of statement about what they’re doing here. Because it makes absolutely no sense to me. How on earth do they expect any suspensions they dole out based on this tactic to hold up to an arbitrator’s review?

Enrique Hernandez’s performance one for the record books

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Entering Thursday’s NLCS Game 5, Dodgers outfielder Enrique Hernandez had never hit a home run nor even driven in a run in the playoffs in his four-year career. He had homered twice in a regular season game just twice and his career-high for RBI in a game was four.

Hernandez hit three home runs and knocked in seven runs to help power the Dodgers past the Cubs 11-1 to win the National League pennant and punch their ticket to the World Series. His first homer was a solo homer to center field in the second inning off of starter Jose Quintana. He blasted a grand slam to right field off of Hector Rondon in the fourth, then tacked on a two-run blast in the ninth inning off of Mike Montgomery to make it 11-1.

Hernandez is the 10th player to hit three home runs in a postseason game. Jose Altuve, of course, did it two weeks ago in Game 1 of the ALDS against the Red Sox. Before Altuve, Pablo Sandoval (2012), Albert Pujols (2011), and Adrian Beltre (2011) were the last players to accomplish the feat. As Jayson Stark points out, Hernandez joins Babe Ruth, Reggie Jackson, Adam Kennedy, and Beltre as players to hit three homers in a series clincher.

Hernandez’s seven RBI set a new National League record for a postseason game. Only four other players — Troy O’Leary, John Valentin, Mo Vaughn, and Edgar Martinez — accomplished the feat.

No one has hit three home runs and knocked in seven-plus in a game… until Hernandez. He certainly picked a good time to break out.