Atlanta Braves v Miami Marlins

D-Backs president still happy with Justin Upton trade


Yeah, it’s early and yeah, Justin Upton isn’t going to post Ruthian offensive stats for an entire season, but the initial results on the trade between the D-Backs and Braves isn’t exactly even. Upton is tied for the Major League lead in homers with six and is looking like a tour de force in the middle of the Braves’ batting order.

The Braves acquired Upton along with third baseman Chris Johnson from the Diamondbacks back in January in exchange for Martin Prado, Randall Delgado, and prospects Brandon Drury, Nick Ahmed, and Zeke Spruill.

What made the trade particularly shocking is the confluence of Upton’s age (25), team-friendly contract ($38.5 million over the next three seasons), and his obvious skill. Players like Upton rarely become available — even more rarely at that relative cheapness — and that is becoming the case even more lately as teams work tirelessly to get their franchise superstars locked up for a long time.

Diamondbacks president and CEO Derrick Hall still thinks the trade worked out well for both teams.

“I think it’s a situation where it was a perfect situation for him actually and for us we got what we needed,” Hall stated. “I mean this was just two different teams that had two different needs and it worked out well for both, not to mention we still have four prospects that we’re going to be dealing with in the next few years.”

The reality is, the D-Backs were under no pressure to get rid of Upton. Any pressure they felt was self-imposed in their desire to construct a more “gritty” roster. This isn’t to say that the players the D-Backs acquired can’t be good, but if you ask 100 current and former GM’s if they would have made the trade from the Braves’ perspective, all 100 would say yes before you even finish your sentence. Any attempt by Arizona’s upper management to spin the Upton trade as a net positive is disingenuous.

Last night was the highest rated World Series Game 1 since 2009

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Roberto Perez #55 of the Cleveland Indians hits a three-run home run during the eighth inning against the Chicago Cubs in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
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Major League Baseball and Fox won’t openly root for any specific team to make the World Series. But you can bet they’re pretty happy with the Cubs making it thanks to the ratings they’re delivering.

The Indians win over the Chicago in Game 1 last night drew a 12.6 overnight rating. That means, on average, 12.6 percent of the TVs in the largest 56 markets were tuned in to the game. That’s the best World Series first game rating since 2009 when the Phillies-Yankees game drew a 13.8 overnight rating. Last night’s rating was up 20% from last year’s 10.5 between the Royals-Mets and up 58% from the Giants-Royals in 2014.

Now the rooting, however quiet it may be, will continue: for the Cubs to make a series out of this so as to keep the magic numbers coming.

Twins hire Rangers assistant Thad Levine to be their new GM

BOSTON, MA - June 4: The Minnesota Twins logo is seen during the fifth inning of the game against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park on June 4, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Winslow Townson/Getty Images)
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Rangers assistant general manager Thad Levine has been hired as the Twins’ next General Manager. It has not been made official, but multiple outlets are reporting the hire. Levine will join Derek Falvey, who was named the Twins’ new president of baseball operations last month.

Levine has been the Rangers assistant GM since the 2005 season, working as GM Jon Daniels’ second in command. He’ll still be second in command in Minnesota, but with an elevated title as is the style of the day. He previously worked with the Rockies. He has, according to various reports, been conversant in statistical analysis as well as traditional scouting and player development. As is also the style of the day.