Carlos Quentin charges mound, Zack Greinke suffers broken collarbone

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Carlos Quentin charged the mound after being drilled by Zack Greinke, leading to a benches-clearing incident in the sixth inning of Thursday’s Dodgers-Padres game.

Greinke, a right-hander, suffered a broken left collarbone in the fight that ensued and is likely DL bound.

Don Mattingly, steamed after what turned out to be a 3-2 win, said afterwards, “[Quentin] should not play a game until Greinke can pitch. If he plays before Greinke, something is wrong. Nothing happens if that guy goes to first base.”

Despite the fact that there was a full count at the time, Quentin obviously felt Greinke’s pitch was intentional after a Jason Marquis 0-2 pitch was thrown towards Matt Kemp’s head earlier in the contest. Kemp spent a great deal of time jawing with the Padres with both teams on the field and had to be restrained by Josh Beckett and manager Don Mattingly.

After the parties returned to the dugouts initially, the Dodgers’ Jerry Hairston Jr. sprinted back out towards the Padres dugout, stirring things back up.

Here’s the video:

Following the game, Quentin and Kemp got into an altercation in the players parking lot and had to be separated.

Kemp, Hairston, Greinke and Quentin were all ejected. Quentin will face a five- or six-game suspension if history is any indication.

Greinke is the bigger loss, though. He signed the richest contract of the offseason — a six-year, $147 million pact — to become the Dodgers’ No. 2 starter behind Clayton Kershaw. A broken collarbone is often a 6-8 week injury for most players. That it’s to Greinke’s off arm may aid his timetable a bit, but it’s not something he’ll be able to pitch through right away.

Fortunately, the Dodgers do possess considerable pitching depth, even after trading Aaron Harang earlier this week. They could either activate Ted Lilly from the DL and put him in the rotation or they could promote Chris Capuano from the bullpen.

Previous bad blood between Greinke and Quentin could explain why Quentin charged the mound. Greinke hit Quentin in the back with a pitch on April 8, 2009, and Quentin took steps toward the mound that time before catcher Miguel Olivo restrained him. That happened in the fourth inning of a game between the Royals and White Sox. Three innings earlier, Greinke had a pitch slip that nearly hit Quentin in the head.

“He had a reason for [being upset],” Greinke told MLB.com afterwards. “Any time you throw it that high, it’s justified. You’ve got to be better than that and not pitch like that. You’re going to make mistakes, but the last thing you want to do is hit someone where it could seriously hurt them. As soon as I let go of it, I was scared for him.”

Max Scherzer will not be ready for Opening Day

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Ten days ago Nationals ace Max Scherzer said he’d be ready for the start of the regular season. “I’m gonna do it,” Scherzer said.

[Ron Howard from “Arrested Development” voice] — No, he’s not:

Nationals manager Dusty Baker said that Max Scherzer is not on track to be the team’s opening day starter, and will most likely open the season as the third pitcher in the rotation.

He’s still projected to make it to the opening rotation, taking the hill, most likely, on Thursday April 6 against the Marlins. At least if the schedule doesn’t slip any more.

Scherzer, as you probably know, has a stress fracture in the knuckle of his right ring finger, which has messed with his preparation and has caused him to alter his grip a bit. As of now Stephen Strasburg will get the Opening Day nod.

Theo Epstein named The World’s Greatest Leader

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Fortune Magazine has put out a list of The World’s Greatest Leaders. Not the greatest business leaders, not the greatest leaders in a given industry, but the Greatest Leaders, full stop. The greatest according to Fortune: The Cubs’ Theo Epstein.

For some context, Pope Francis was third. Angela Merkel was 10th. Lebron James was the next greatest sports leader, ranked 11th. Take Fortune’s methodology with a grain of salt, however, given that it has John McCain above Merkel — what, exactly, does he lead now? — and Samantha Bee in the top 20.

So what makes Theo the world’s best leader according to Fortune?

The Cubs owe their success to a five-year rebuilding program that featured a concatenation of different leadership styles. The team thrived under the affable patience of owner Tom Ricketts, and, later, under the innovative eccentricity of manager Joe Maddon. But most important of all was the evolution of the club’s president for baseball operations, Theo Epstein, the wunderkind executive who realized he would need to grow as a leader in order to replicate in Chicago the success he’d had with the Boston Red Sox.

I don’t want to take anything away from what Theo has done — he’s a Hall of Fame executive already in my view — but I feel like maybe one needs to adjust for the fact that this is a baseball team we’re talking about. They’re the whole world to us and their brands are nationally and even world famous, but as an organization, sports teams are rather small. There are guys who run reasonably-sized HVAC companies with more employees than a baseball team and they don’t get the benefit of an antitrust exemption and a rule which allows them to get their pick of the best new employees if they had a bad year the year before.

Really, not trying to throw shade here, just thinking that being the spiritual father for 1.2 billion Catholics or running a foundation that serves 55 million needy children — like the woman who comes in at number 14 — is a bit of a tougher trick.

But this will make a great framed magazine article on Theo’s wall in Wrigley Field.