Mariano Rivera is better than me. Better than you. Better than all of us.

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The Wall Street Journal reports on the unique nature of Mariano Rivera’s farewell tour. Rather than going to each park and letting people make him feel special and honored, he’s connecting with the unknown and unsung in each park to let them know how much he appreciates their contributions:

When Rivera decided to retire, he announced that in each ballpark, he wanted to meet people behind the scenes—employees or fans or people connected to the game who don’t get to tell their stories. He has spent a lifetime in the spotlight, the solitary figure in the middle of the mound. But as his baseball career enters his final months, Rivera has found pleasure in quiet moments with everyday people who perform the often thankless jobs of the baseball world.

Like, stadium employees. Or, in the example that kicks off the article, the guy who beats the drum at Indians games.  And Rivera praises that guy rather than takes his drumsticks away and threatens violence, which is more than I could do the time I met him.

There are people who have spent 20 years trying to find things to hate about the Yankees. And if you’re determined to do that kind of thing it’s not really that hard. But I’ll be damned if anyone can say a bad thing about Mariano Rivera. I’ve literally heard nothing bad about the guy ever. And this kind of thing makes you think like such a thing would be an impossibility.

Hunter Pence appeared as guest on Bill Nye’s new show

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Bill Nye — yeah, “the science guy” — has a new show on Netflix called Bill Nye Saves the World. His show ties science to other areas such as politics, pop culture, and sports. Giants outfielder Hunter Pence was invited to appear as a guest.

Nye talked a bit about Pence and marveled at the dedication players must have to stay competitive in the sport. Nye called Pence “a cool guy” and “charming,” which is not surprising.

Shelby Miller left Sunday’s start with forearm tightness

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Diamondbacks pitcher Shelby Miller left Sunday’s start against the Dodgers after four-plus innings due to tightness in his right forearm, the team announced. He’ll be reevaluated tomorrow. Needless to say, though, a forearm injury is very concerning. In his four innings, Miller gave up three runs on four hits and five walks with three strikeouts, raising his ERA to 4.09.

Miller, 26, has had a nightmare of a time since joining the Diamondbacks in December 2015. Last year, he made 20 starts and posted a 6.15 ERA. He suffered a finger injury suffered from scraping his hand on the pitcher’s mound with his follow-through, and he was also demoted to Triple-A during the summer as well.