Mariano Rivera is better than me. Better than you. Better than all of us.

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The Wall Street Journal reports on the unique nature of Mariano Rivera’s farewell tour. Rather than going to each park and letting people make him feel special and honored, he’s connecting with the unknown and unsung in each park to let them know how much he appreciates their contributions:

When Rivera decided to retire, he announced that in each ballpark, he wanted to meet people behind the scenes—employees or fans or people connected to the game who don’t get to tell their stories. He has spent a lifetime in the spotlight, the solitary figure in the middle of the mound. But as his baseball career enters his final months, Rivera has found pleasure in quiet moments with everyday people who perform the often thankless jobs of the baseball world.

Like, stadium employees. Or, in the example that kicks off the article, the guy who beats the drum at Indians games.  And Rivera praises that guy rather than takes his drumsticks away and threatens violence, which is more than I could do the time I met him.

There are people who have spent 20 years trying to find things to hate about the Yankees. And if you’re determined to do that kind of thing it’s not really that hard. But I’ll be damned if anyone can say a bad thing about Mariano Rivera. I’ve literally heard nothing bad about the guy ever. And this kind of thing makes you think like such a thing would be an impossibility.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.