Nolan Ryan will remain the Rangers’ CEO

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There has been speculation over the past several weeks that Nolan Ryan might leave his executive post with the Rangers. Ryan felt like his role was being diminished and that he no longer had much say in club decisions. But all is suddenly well.

Evan Grant of the Dallas Morning News reports that Ryan agreed Wednesday to “stay with the club for the foreseeable future.” He will retain the title of CEO and general manager Jon Daniels will serve as the Rangers’ president of baseball operations. Rick George will be president of business operations.

Recent reports suggested that Ryan was fully prepared to leave, but that could have been a negotiating tactic. The 66-year-old Hall of Famer has been a member of the Texas front office since 2008.

Here’s the official press release from principal owners Ray Davis and Bob Simpson:

“We’ve had meaningful conversations with Nolan Ryan over the past several weeks and are pleased that our focus is now on working together to win a championship for our fans. Over the years Nolan has made extraordinary contributions to the Texas Rangers organization, both on and off the field, including providing valuable guidance to Jon Daniels and Rick George. His leadership as our chief executive — with both baseball and business operations reporting to him — has been vital to our success and offers us a bright future.”

And a short written statement from Ryan, via the Fort Worth Star-Telegram:

“After productive discussions the last several weeks with Ray Davis and Bob Simpson about the structure of our organization, together we are moving forward. In my role as CEO, I am focused on working closely with ownership and with Jon Daniels and Rick George to build on the success of the past five years and to bring a championship to Arlington.”

The Rangers lost 2-0 to the Rays on Wednesday afternoon and are 6-3 on the young season.

Must-Click Link: Sherri Nichols, Sabermetic Pioneer

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If you are old enough and lame enough as I am, you may have lurked around on sabermetic message boards in the 1990s. If you did, you may have heard of Sherri Nichols, who back in the day, was a significant contributor to the advancement of statistical analysis, particularly defensive analysis.

While it’s probably better that not everyone is as old and nerdy as me, the downside of it is that most people haven’t heard of Nichols and know nothing about her contributions. That changes today with Ben Lindbergh’s excellent analysis of Nichols and her work over at The Ringer, which I recommend that you all read.

The short version: Nichols is the one who planted the seed about on-base percentage being valuable in the mind of Baseball Prospectus Founder Gary Huckabay, back in the late 80s. She’s also the one most responsible for the rise of zone-based defensive metrics in the 1990s, such as Defensive Average, which she created and which served as the basis for other such metrics going forward. She also played a critical role in the development of RetroSheet, which collected almost all extant box score and play-by-play information going back to the turn of the 20th century, thereby making so much of the information available at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs possible. A key contribution there: making the information free and available to everyone, rather than closing the underlying data off as proprietary and either charging for access or keeping it in-house like some recent data collectors have chosen to do. Ahem.

A larger takeaway than all of Nichols’ contributions is just how loathe the baseball community was to listen to a woman back then. I mean, yeah, they’re still loathe to listen to women now, as indicated by the small number of women who hold jobs in baseball operations departments, but back then it was even worse, as evidenced by Lindbergh’s stories and Nichols’ anecdotes.

A great read and a great history lesson.