Jamie Moyer hasn’t given up on another comeback at age 50

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Jamie Moyer lasted only 10 starts with the Rockies last season after returning from Tommy John elbow surgery and spent the rest of the year trying unsuccessfully to pitch himself back to the big leagues at Triple-A, but he still hasn’t given up on another comeback.

Moyer, who’s now 50 years old, was in Seattle last night to throw out the first pitch at the Mariners-Astros games and spoke to Geoff Baker of the Seattle Times about his status:

I haven’t closed that door yet. I don’t know when I would make a decision. I really haven’t put a lot of thought into it. I’m enjoying my time at home at this point. I’ve got a college senior playing baseball. A college freshman starting at Pepperdine, playing baseball. I’ve got a daughter graduating from high school, going to college. Another daughter that’s going to be a junior next year. And then I have two fourth graders and two first graders.

So, I’m enjoying my time. And I’ve got a garden growing. I’ve got lettuce I’m eating now and micro-gardens. I’m excited about that. I’ve got some fruit trees going in. I’ve got a puppy. So, I’m doing some things I haven’t done in a long time.

First of all, that’s a lot of kids. Second of all, Moyer did admit that he’s basically stopped throwing and has “just kind of let my body kind of amp itself down.” So obviously while he hasn’t officially announced anything, he’s all but retired. It was a helluva run. And congrats on the garden.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”