We’ve done a 360 on “The Best Fans in Baseball” thing

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I’m not sure when the notion that Cardinals fans are “The Best Fans in Baseball” started. I think it was during the McGwire years or soon after when some high profile veterans chose to wind down their career in St. Louis, citing said fans as such.  And the claim was repeated without much criticism for several years after, even by folks with no connection to St. Louis. National broadcasters not named Buck and McCarver and such.

In recent years TBFiB thing has started to grow quotation marks, with many mockingly citing it or only citing it when Cardinals fans do something that demonstrates the opposite. Joe Strauss of the Post-Dispatch is great for that, by the way.  The point is, there is now way more of an eye-roll associated with TBFiB thing in the past couple of years, even if no one thinks the claim is particularly important one way or another.

Today Bernie Miklasz is going revivalist on the idea, giving a full-throated endorsement of Cardinals fans as The Best Fans in Baseball:

This [Best Fans in Baseball] boasting annoys other fan bases, especially in Cincinnati, Milwaukee and on the North Side of Chicago. I’m sure that Red Sox fans throughout New England would dispute the St. Louis claim. The New York Yankees’ faithful would likely offer a few choice, colorful words of dissent.

Except that deep down inside, they know it is true.

Brave stance for a St, Louis radio/newspaper guy to take.

(just kidding Bernie, love ya, baby)

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.