Reds score nine times in ninth to embarrass Cardinals 13-4

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The joke was on Shin-Soo Choo for most of Monday’s Reds-Cardinals game, as the newly converted center fielder dropped a pair of Yadier Molina flyballs to give St. Louis three of its four runs.

Then came the top of the ninth inning. With Cardinals closer Mitchell Boggs in a 4-4 game, the Reds exploded — well, that’s probably not precisely the right word — for nine runs, turning the NL Central battle into a 13-4 laugher.

Here’s how the inning went:

– Shin-Soo Choo walked
– Chris Heisey fouled off a sac bunt attempt, then popped out (1st out)
– Choo advanced to second on a wild pitch
– Joey Votto was intentionally walked
– Brandon Phillips flared a ball down the right field line that bounced off the chalk for an RBI double (5-4)
– Jay Bruce was intentionally walked, loading the bases
– Todd Frazier walked (6-4)
– Jack Hannahan grounded to third, David Freese bobbled, everyone safe on infield single (7-4)
– Ryan Hanigan grounded to short, Pete Kozma bobbled, everyone safe on error (8-4)

At this point, Boggs finally gets pulled in favor of Marc Rzepczynski

– Cesar Izturis singled to right (9-4)
– Shin-Soo Choo tripled to left (12-4)
– Chris Heisey grounded out (2nd out)
– Joey Votto singled to left (13-4)
– Brandon Phillips walked
– Jay Bruce grounded one off Rzepczynski’s glove for an infield single
– Todd Frazier struck out (3rd out)

Two intentional walks, three regular walks. An error and two more infield singles that could have been errors.

In all, it was pretty much the ugliest inning you’ll ever see from a good baseball team. Boggs and Rzepczynski combined to throw 52 pitches to 16 batters. Boggs was charged with six earned runs, taking his ERA to 14.54. Rzepczynski gave up two runs.

Miguel Sano suspended one game for altercation with Tigers

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Twins third baseman Miguel Sano has been suspended one game for his role in Saturday’s altercation with the Tigers, Mike Berardino of the St. Paul Pioneer Press reports. Sano will appeal his suspension, so he’ll be eligible to play until that is resolved.

On Saturday, Tigers outfielder JaCoby Jones was hit in the face by Twins pitcher Justin Haley. The Tigers’ Matt Boyd threw behind Sano when he came to the plate in the fifth inning, seemingly exacting revenge. Sano took exception, catcher James McCann pushed his glove into Sano’s face, and the benches emptied. Both Boyd and Sano were ejected from the game.

Sano has hit well in the early going, batting .241/.413/.569 with four home runs and 14 RBI with an MLB-best 17 walks in 75 plate appearances. Losing Sano for only one game won’t be the biggest deal for the Twins. Eduardo Escobar would get the start at third base to fill in for Sano if he loses his appeal.

Boyd was fined an undisclosed amount and not suspended, per MLB.com’s Jason Beck.

Matt Barnes suspended four games for throwing at Manny Machado

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ESPN’s Buster Olney reports that Red Sox reliever Matt Barnes has been suspended four games and fined an undisclosed amount for throwing at Orioles third baseman Manny Machado on Sunday. Barnes was exacting revenge for Machado’s slide which injured second baseman Dustin Pedroia on Friday, and was ejected immediately after throwing the pitch at Machado.

Barnes is appealing his suspension, so he will be able to participate in games until the issue is resolved. The 26-year-old right-hander has a 3.60 ERA and an 11/6 K/BB ratio in 10 innings so far this season.

The suspension is rather light considering Barnes’ intent. Barnes missed, thankfully, as he hit Machado’s bat rather than his helmet. Had he hit his intended target, though, baseball might’ve been out one superstar third baseman. Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports wrote today that Major League Baseball needs to beef up its punishment for players attempting to injure other players. And he’s totally right about that. The punishment is neither enough to deter players from attempting to injure their peers, nor is it enough for teams to deter their own players from doing so.