Jon Miller on stats, Joe Morgan, Jack Morris, Earl Weaver and more

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David Laurila of FanGraphs did a Q&A with Giants broadcaster Jon Miller. It deals mostly with statistics and how he as a broadcaster understands and uses them. It also touches a lot on his former ESPN broadcast partner, Joe Morgan, and whether the book on him — that he as perhaps the perfect sabermetric ballplayer yet, as an analyst, failed to grasp what made players like him great — is fair or not.  Miller goes on to talk about a couple other sabermetric causes, Bert Blyleven and Jack Morris.

I feel, overall, Miller was being a bit too charitable with Morgan and Morris. Miller is too nice to bury anyone, of course, and those guys are fellow broadcasters so perhaps that explains it, but I feel like he’s biting his tongue a bit. No way he believes that pitching to the score jive, right?

But if there are any flaws with what Miller has to say, they’re made up for with a great Earl Weaver anecdote:

I saw Earl Weaver put on a suicide squeeze bunt, in Milwaukee. It worked. Everybody asked him, ‘Wait, we thought you told us you didn’t even have a sign for a suicide squeeze, because you hated it so much.’ Earl said, ‘I still don’t.’ I asked him, ‘How did you put it on then?’ He said, ‘I whistled at Cal Ripken, Sr., my third base coach. Then I shouted at him, ‘Squeeze! Squeeze! Then I motioned a bunt.’ I said, ‘Paul Molitor was playing third. Didn’t he hear you?’ Earl said, ‘If he did, I’m sure he thought there was no way we were putting it on, or I wouldn’t have been yelling for it.’

Good read all around.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.