Clayton Kershaw, Chris Davis, MLB players of the week

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There’s clearly an anti-Upton and Morse bias afoot in Major League Baseball. Bears investigating. From the MLB press release machine:

Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw has been named National League Player of the Week for the period ending April 7th. The announcement was made earlier today on MLB Network. Kershaw went 2-0 in two starts last week and did not allow a single earned run in a Major League-high 16.0 innings of work. His 0.00 ERA ranked tied for first among Major League starters.

Baltimore Orioles first baseman Chris Davis has been named the American League Player of the Week for his historic
performance during the period ending April 7th … Davis batted .455 (10-for-22) with three doubles, four home runs, 17 RBI and five runs scored in six games. For the week, the lefty-hitting slugger led all Major League hitters in RBI and slugging percentage (1.136) and was second overall in total bases (25). Among A.L. batters, Chris tied for second in homers, was fifth in batting average and was tied for sixth in on-base percentage (.500).

Davis, in a sense, has won this award twice in a row as he was co-AL Player of the week for the last week of 2012, sharing it with Justin Verlander.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.