Josh Hamilton

Josh Hamilton: expecting boos in his return to Texas, will certainly get them

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UPDATE: Hamilton came up to boos, but nothing incredible. Then Hamilton struck out on four pitches and the crowd exploded with cheers, way louder than the boos.  I assume that this drama is over.  That is, unless Hamilton himself adds to it.  Which it seems like he’s doing. Here’s what he had to say after the game:

“I’m glad I could help create spirit and fire in this town. This was louder than any playoff game that I’ve ever been to.”

This is getting good.

12:30 PM: If there is anyone who doesn’t think that Josh Hamilton is going to be booed — and booed lustily — when he comes to bat in today’s Angles-Rangers game they’re crazy. It may be the most ferocious booing we’ve heard for a player since Barry Bonds retired. Or since J.D. Drew made his first trip to Philadelphia. What we have here is the perfect storm of booing: a fan base that hates the player and a player who doesn’t seem to care a lick about that.  It’s actually kinda glorious if you think about it. The closest baseball will ever come to professional wrestling.

For those unaware of the back story, Josh Hamilton spent five season playing for the Texas Rangers. In those five season he played in 647 games, hit 142 home runs, drove in 506 and posted a batting average of .305. He also collected an MVP award and was the best hitter on a Rangers team which made it to two straight World Series. Then, this offseason, he hit free agency and signed with the division rival Los Angeles Angels for five years and $125 million.

That was business, though. Lots of players have left the Rangers via free agency and have not drawn the ire of fans. Indeed, given his age, injury history, his history with substance and his reported contract demands, most folks didn’t think Hamilton would stay in Texas anyway. The front office certainly didn’t make a push to keep him.  Between that and all of the good times he brought to Rangers fans, you’d think there would be enough to sustain at least some affection between Hamilton and the fan base despite his now playing for a rival. But no, there’s none.

The love affair was clearly over before Hamilton left town, actually. Rangers fans began booing Hamilton late last year as he struggled mightily down the stretch. A stretch in which the Rangers blew a five game division lead with nine games left to play. In the final, division-losing game to the Athletics, Hamilton dropped a routine fly ball which contributed to the collapse. Including the Rangers’ wild card loss to the Orioles, Hamilton struck out 20 times in his last 46 at-bats. Four strikeouts came in the wild card game. Warranted or not, Rangers fans equated Hamilton’s poor play with a poor attitude and believe Hamilton quit on his team.

That alone would likely lead to boos upon his return today, but he really set everyone off back in February when he told a Dallas radio station that Dallas was not a baseball town:

“Texas, especially Dallas, has always been a football town. They’re supportive, but they also got a little spoiled at the same time, pretty quickly. You think about three to four years ago. It’s like, come on man, are you happier there again?”

Thing is, Hamilton is probably right about that. The Cowboys will always be king in Dallas and Rangers fans, like a lot of fans of teams who experience sustained success, probably have gotten a bit spoiled. But being technically right and saying the right thing are not the same thing, and the blowback Hamilton has received since making those statements has been pretty significant.  But Hamilton is not backing down either. Indeed, just this morning he said this to Bob Nightengale of USA Today:

“The truth is the truth. And that was the truth. I don’t regret anything I said … If they booed me when I played there why wouldn’t they boo me now?”

They will boo him now. With extreme gusto.  And, while it may be a bit uncomfortable for Hamilton, it’ll definitely add spice to an Angels-Rangers rivalry that is already a whole heck of a lot of fun.

A-Rod to host a reality show featuring broke ex-athletes

NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 12: Alex Rodriguez #13 of the New York Yankees answers question in a press conference after the game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on August 12, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Drew Hallowell/Getty Images)
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Alex Rodriguez’s transition into retirement has featured a serious move into the business world. He has gone back to school, worked seriously on investments and has started his own corporation. Yes, he’s set for life after making more money than any baseball player in history, but even if his bank account wasn’t fat, you get the sense that he’d be OK given what we’ve seen of his work ethic and savvy in recent years.

He’s going to be getting another paycheck soon, though. For hosting a reality show featuring athletes who are not in as good a financial shape as A-Rod is:

Interesting. Hopefully, like so many other reality shows featuring the formerly rich and famous, this one is not exploitative. Not gonna hold my breath because that’s what that genre is all about, unfortunately, but here’s hoping A-Rod can help some folks with this.

Great Moments in Not Understanding The Rules

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Bill Livingston of the Cleveland Plain Dealer is a Hall of Fame voter. In the past he has voted for players who used PEDs, but he’s never been totally happy with it, seeing the whole PED mess as a dilemma for voters.

On the one hand he doesn’t like voting for users and doesn’t like harming those who were clean by shifting votes away from them, but on the other hand, he doesn’t want to pretend history didn’t happen and that baseball hasn’t been filled with cheaters forever. What to do?

This year he decided to abstain altogether. A fair and noble act if one is as conflicted as Livingston happens to be. Except . . . he didn’t actually abstain:

Major league baseball will confer bronzed immortality on a few players Wednesday when the results of the national baseball writers’ balloting for the Hall of Fame will be announced.

I had a 2017 ballot. I returned it signed, but blank, with an explanatory note.

A blank ballot, signed and submitted, is not an abstention. It’s counted as a vote for no one. Each “no” vote increases the denominator in the calculation of whether or not a candidate has received 75% of the vote and has gained induction. An abstention, however, would not. So, in effect, Livingston has voted against all of the players on the ballot, both PED-tainted and clean, even though it appears that that was not his intention.

This is the second time in three years a Cleveland writer has had . . . issues with his Hall of Fame ballot. In the 2014-15 voting period, Paul Hoynes simply lost his ballot. Now Livingston misunderstood how to abstain.

I worry quite often that Ohio is gonna mess up a major election. I guess I’m just worrying about the wrong election.