Tim Lincecum walks seven, beats Dodgers anyway

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Tim Lincecum’s awful spring, in which he gave up 18 runs in 15 1/3 innings, only added to the Giants’ doubts about what they’d get from their two-time Cy Young winner this season. They’re probably no closer to figuring it out after Lincecum walked seven yet still defeated the Dodgers on Wednesday.

Lincecum surrendered just two runs in five innings, and both were unearned. The first came on a passed ball from Hector Sanchez. The second came on a sac fly following an error from Buster Posey at first base. Meanwhile, the Giants offense came through with five runs off Josh Beckett in the 5-3 victory.

The Lincecum-Sanchez pairing was a constant in the second half of last year, and while that wasn’t supposed to carry over in 2013, it was a convenient option tonight with normal first baseman Brandon Belt ailing. If the Giants decide that Lincecum and Sanchez need to stick together, then Belt could see time in left field to make room for Posey at first base.

Lincecum’s performance tonight made him the first pitcher since old Giants teammate Jonathan Sanchez to walk seven and allow no earned runs in a start. Sanchez did it against the Naitonals on April 30, 2011 when he allowed just one hit in five innings. Prior to that, Edwin Jackson walked eight in his no-hitter for the Diamondbacks on June 25, 2010.

Lincecum matched his career high for walks, which he established against the same Dodgers team just last September (again in a victory). His walk rate increased for the third straight year last season (90 BB in 186 IP).

Brock Holt has been shut down from game activity

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Things have gone from bad to worse for Red Sox’ outfielder Brock Holt, who was shut down “for the foreseeable future” on Friday after meeting with head trauma specialist Michael Collins. The Red Sox placed Holt on the 10-day disabled list in April after he began experiencing vertigo, the latest in a series of head injuries he’s sustained since last spring.

According to the Boston Herald’s Jason Mastrodonato, the outfielder was initially advised to attempt playing through his symptoms, but it quickly became apparent that the strategy wasn’t going to work. Now, the plan is to shut him down from any game activity in the hopes that he’ll be able to recover from all lingering symptoms before returning to the roster. Club manager John Farrell told reporters that the 28-year-old is still cleared to take batting practice and work on his defense, but won’t continue his rehab starts in Triple-A Pawtucket for the time being.

Holt had been making regular appearances for the Pawtucket Red Sox and was batting .209/.292/.372 with two home runs through 14 games this spring. This season marks his fifth run within the Red Sox’ organization. He experienced a bit of a slump at the plate in 2016 and slashed .255/.322/.383 after breaking out during his first All-Star year in 2015.

Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe suggests that the team’s concern for Holt extends past his setbacks at the plate. It’s still a long road to a full recovery, and while Farrell told reporters he believes the outfielder is on track to make a return sometime in 2017, he’ll need to make sure that Holt is both physically and mentally prepared to do so.

Nationals Acquire Ryan Raburn From White Sox

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The Washington Nationals have acquired outfielder Ryan Raburn from the Chicago White Sox. Raburn had been playing at Triple-A Charlotte. He’ll be assigned to Triple-A Syracuse in the Nats organization. The Nationals will send cash or a player to be named later to the White Sox to complete the deal.

Raburn has yet to play in the majors this season. Last year he hit .220/.309/.404 with nine homers in 113 games for the Colorado Rockies. The year before that he hit an excellent .301/.393/.543 in part time play for the Indians. Over the course of his 11 year career the 36-year-old has hit .253/.317/.436, which breaks down to an OPS+ of exactly 100, which is league average. Primarily an outfielder, Raburn has played every position except shortstop and catcher in his career. He’s even pitched twice.

The Nats plans for him aren’t entirely clear, but depth it depth.