Looks like another season of Stephen Strasburg arguments is underway

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Yesterday many heads were scratched when Davey Johnson pulled the allegedly innings-limit-free Stephen Strasburg after seven innings and a mere 80 pitches. Today Jason Reid of the Washington Post has a column up in which he vigorously defends the decision.

Thing is: the defense looks a lot more vigorous than necessary given that, at best, some folks asked Davey Johnson about why Strasburg was pulled. Which is a totally fair post-game question, especially given all the talk which has surrounded Strasburg and his workload. Reid, however, seems to think the very question is invalid, criticizing people in the game who last year second-guessed the Nats’ decisions, and going to P.R. Director lengths to defend Johnson and Mike Rizzo without even nothing that the “maybe Strasburg coulda gone another inning?” side of things is not an irrational query from some insane cabal.

Reid is entitled to his opinion obviously, but it’s striking how in-step most of the Washington Post’s opinions are with those of Nats’ management. To the point where even questioning that authority is looked down upon.

(hat tip to Kevin Reiss for pointing out Reid’s column)

Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto reportedly asks to be traded

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Craig Mish of MLB Network Radio is reporting that Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto has requested a trade out of Miami. Jon Heyman is characterizing it as Realmuto telling the team that he “wouldn’t mind” a trade.

Either way, Realmuto has no power to force a trade. This isn’t the NBA or something. Still, it’s evidence of just how dreary a prospect remaining in Miami is for Marlins veterans in the wake of trades that sent Giancarlo Stanton to New York, Marcell Ozuna to St. Louis.

Realmuto, who will turn 27 just before the 2018 season, hit .278/.332/.451 with 17 homers, 65 RBI, and eight steals over 141 games this past season. He only has three years of service time and is arbitration eligible for the first time this offseason. He made just $562K in the 2017 and will get a big raise this year, but he’s still going to be underpaid based on his production. If the Marlins wanted to trade him, they’d get a nice return. Why they would want to trade him, I have no idea.

Expect more of this sort of thing as the Marlins slash payroll and make it clear that their immediate priorities are more about saving money and less about winning baseball games. Which may or may not be a valid goal for the team’s new owners, but is certainly a letdown for baseball players and fans.