Random Opening Day Thoughts while watching the Yankees and Red Sox

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I turned the Red Sox-Yankees game on at 1pm. There are other games, but the TV with cable next to my desk doesn’t have the Roku player on it, so this one was just easier to do while still actually pretending to work.

We’re not live blogging or anything, but I will be chiming in with some random thoughts on this and other games throughout the afternoon. Some random thoughts:

  • Joba Chamberlain kept the awful mustache out of camp. Brave choice.
  • Lou Piniella threw out the first pitch. He bounced it. Surprised he didn’t then argue with it and get thrown out.
  • CC Sabathia started the actual game off with a fastball to Jacoby Ellsbury. I’ve now seen three Opening Day first pitches counting last night and they were all fastballs down the middle. No one ever starts the season out with some offspeed junk in the dirt. I feel like there are opportunities being lost here. UPDATE: OK, it’s now 4-0 in the second. Maybe Sabathia doesn’t look as good now as he did in the first.
  • That said, Sabathia struck out two of three while giving up a meaningless single to Pedroia. He looks like he could pitch for 50 more years. It’s weird given that he’s the ace of the Yankees, but he may be one of the more underrated pitchers in the game.
  • Heck, the Yankees of all teams may be underrated this year. How we got to this point I have no idea, but there has been more unwarranted hype thrown at a half dozen other teams in the past three years than the Yankees ever got.
  • Robinson Cano reached on a strikeout/passed ball thing. I always like that. Free David Ross.
  • Listening to Rick Sutcliffe and Aaron Boone do color commentary — and listening to Orel Hershiser and John Kruk during last night’s game — and I renew my loathe affair with ex-jock analysts. Baseball is a pretty simple game. There’s nothing wrong with pointing out simple things like “the good player is good” and “scoring runs is how you win.” Yet so many of these guys feel like they have to come up with counterintuitive or obscure points of analysis as a means of justifying themselves and their expertise. They analyze the hell out of everything when life would be so much better if they just let us watch.  Oh well, this is a battle I’ve been resigned to lose for many years now, so I probably shouldn’t complain.

Not that it’s too deep a complaint. I have the sound down low. I may or may not be enjoying a cold one. Baseball is on. It didn’t feel totally right last night, but this afternoon it feels good. The structure of my life is back.

Twins place Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with shin injury

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The Twins have placed third baseman Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with a stress reaction in his left shin, per the Star Tribune’s LaVelle E. Neal. Sano left Saturday’s game against the Diamondbacks after running out a ground ball double play in the fourth inning and was held out of Sunday’s lineup.

Sano, 24, is batting .267/.356/.514 with 28 home runs and 77 RBI in 475 plate appearances this season. The Twins are five back of the Indians for first place in the AL Central and currently hold a tie with the Angels for the second Wild Card slot.

Ehire Adrianza got the start at third base during Sunday’s win and could handle the hot corner while Sano is out. Eduardo Escobar could also get some time at third.

Buster Posey thinks Hector Neris hit him on purpose

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Giants catcher Buster Posey was hit by a pitch in the bottom of the eighth inning during Sunday afternoon’s series finale against the Phillies. It was a first-pitch fastball from closer Hector Neris, who had just entered the game. The Giants then had the bases loaded, but Pablo Sandoval struck out to end the inning and the Giants went on to lose 5-2.

After the game, Posey said he thinks Neris hit him on purpose, per Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle. Posey thinks Neris thought he couldn’t get him out.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, Neris said “absolutely not” when asked if he threw at Posey on purpose. The rest of the Phillies clubhouse, per Zolecki, “Say whaaat?!”

Here’s a link to the video of Posey getting hit. Now that we have automatic intentional walks, pitchers don’t even have to risk throwing four pitches wide of the strike zone to intentionally walk a hitter, so if Neris felt he couldn’t get Posey out, there was still no need to hit him. Furthermore, Neris isn’t going to hit Posey to load the bases and put the go-ahead run on first in a 4-2 ballgame. Sandoval has been a much worse hitter than Posey, for sure, but Neris would lose the platoon advantage if he felt like facing Sandoval instead, anyway.

Getting hit hurts, so it’s understandable Posey may have been salty in the moment. But after the game, when the pain has subsided and he’s had time to think over everything, there’s no way Posey should still come to the conclusion that Neris was trying to hit him on purpose.