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In praise of Vin Scully

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This is not the almost obligatory “Vin Scully is the best” stuff. I get that and participate in that often, but I almost feel like Scully has become such an institution that people feel like they have to say that, even if Scully isn’t doing anything particularly great.

But today he did something, the kind of thing you don’t notice too often, but which is really the stuff that makes him great. In the third inning of the Dodgers-Giants game, Angel Pagan was on first base, Clayton Kershaw holding him on. Scully talked about Kershaw’s success at holding runners on. A minute later Pagan took off for second and was nailed by A.J. Ellis. The reason he was out mostly had to do with Kershaw messing with his timing.

No, it’s not spectacular that Scully foreshadowed the caught stealing as such. The greatness of it was that, to Scully, there really was nothing more important in the moment than talking about what might happen with that runner on base and that pitcher on the mound. The caught stealing stats weren’t dropped in quickly, as if read straight from the stat sheet. Scully was in the moment, delivering the game to us, not at all distracted by overarching news stories, who he talked to before the game or any of the noise that so often pollutes broadcasters. Scully does not consider himself a reporter at all. He’s a broadcaster, in the purest sense of the term.

Maybe I’m not doing the moment justice here. But that moment, after watching baseball for nearly five hours, stood out as something so much higher and better than everything else because it flowed so naturally with what I was watching and thinking at the time. Scully is praised for his longevity and his stories and his style all the time, but it’s in these little moments where he really shines.

Tim Tebow’s workout seems like fun

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Tim Tebow is, as we speak, working out for some 40 scouts from 20 organizations and an untold number of members of the media. So far he has run and jumped and thrown and, in a moment or two, will take his hacks. First BP swings, then live, full-speed BP off of a couple of former major leaguers.

His 60 yard dash time was supposedly excellent. On the 80-20 scouting scale he’s supposedly in the 50-60 range, according to people tweeting about it who know what they’re talking about. The guy is certainly big and strong and in amazing shape and that’s not nothing.

Also this:

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That’s from MLB’s Twitter, which provides us with some more in-action shots.

 

Here he is playing right field out there in the distance someplace:

Good luck, kid.

Adrian Beltre puts his helmet on backwards to face a switch pitcher

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“A” switch pitcher is probably not the most accurate way to put that. It’s more like “The” switch pitcher, as Pat Venditte of the Mariners is the only one extant.

Last night the right-handed hitting Adrian Beltre had to face Venditte, who obviously chose to pitch righty to the Rangers third baseman. Before coming up to the plate, Beltre jokingly donned his helmet backwards and pretended that he’d hit left-handed:

 

He needn’t have bothered. Beltre doubled to left field off of Venditte, showing that at some point, platoon splits really don’t matter.