Japanese high school pitcher has thrown 22 innings and 391 pitches since Tuesday

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OK, now this is pretty crazy. According to Ben Badler of Baseball America, Japanese high school pitcher Tomohiro Anraku has logged a total of 22 innings and 391 pitches over a five-day span in “Spring Koshien,” the country’s top national high school invitational tournament. Seriously.

After throwing an eye-popping 232 pitches in a complete-game 13-inning victory on Tuesday, the 16-year-old sensation bounced back on three-days rest today and threw 159 pitches over nine innings as part of a 4-1 win. While Anraku touched 94 mph with his fastball on Tuesday, his velocity was understandably down a bit today. However, he still struck out eight and even reached 92 mph for his final pitch of the ballgame.

While this sounds flat-out crazy given how pitchers are protected these days, it’s not out of the ordinary for high school pitchers in Japan to have extreme workloads. When he was 17, Daisuke Matsuzaka infamously threw 250 pitches in a 17-inning complete game. Ryota Shimoishi, who started against Anraku on Tuesday, threw 219 pitches of his own.

And get this, Anraku might not be done. His team plays again on Monday while the semifinals are on Tuesday and the championship game is on Wednesday. He’s quickly emerging as one of the top high school pitchers in the world, so hopefully his right arm survives the week.

MLBPA agrees to extend deadline for new posting agreement between MLB, NPB

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Update (7:00 PM ET): The MLBPA announces that the deadline has been extended 24 hours while MLB and NPB continue to negotiate a new agreement for the posting system. The new deadline is 8 PM ET on Tuesday.

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.