Wanna buy Jamie McCourt’s house for $65 million?

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Justin Verlander could. Like, three times:

Former Dodgers Chief Executive Jamie McCourt is quietly offering her Westside estate at $65 million.

The Palladian-style villa, which is not in the Multiple Listing Service, was marketed as having 20,000 square feet of living space when she and ex-husband Frank McCourt bought the property in 2004 for about $25 million. Also on the 2.6-acre site then were two guesthouses, a tennis court and an outdoor swimming pool. She has since added a subterranean indoor pool.

This is all a nice reminder of the spectacular business sense the McCourts had. They nearly went broke running a baseball team, which is almost impossible to do, while purchasing multiple homes in the same city — including two adjacent homes in Malibu — as the real estate market was imploding.

Frank did OK because he was stubborn enough and lucky enough to finally be forced to unload the Dodgers just as MLB franchise values were skyrocketing. But I have this feeling Jamie is gonna do way worse on the real estate with which she walked away from the marriage.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.