Jim Riggleman: paying the price for quitting

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Jorge Arangure of Sports on Earth caught up with Jim Riggleman recently. Riggleman is entering his second straight season as a minor league manager. And the reason he’s in the minor leagues is because he quit on the Washington Nationals in 2011, and as Arangure notes, baseball will forgive anything but someone who just ups and quits. Ask Mike Hargrove.

Riggleman, however, doesn’t sound like he regrets much:

“As I’ve told many people, it wasn’t the smart thing to do,” Riggleman said. “But it was thought out and it had been going for awhile, but it wasn’t the smart decision. But I thought it was the right decision. That’s the consequences sometimes. Things don’t work out perfectly as you hope. I got to live with my decision.”

I wonder if Riggleman’s fate would have been all that different if he had done the smart thing and let his contract run out with the Nationals where, no, I don’t think anyone was going to renew it. As the article notes, Riggleman was never seen by anyone as the guy to take a team to the next level. And while he has always done admirable service as a guy to take a team that is down its luck and be, well, a placeholder until it is better, those jobs don’t keep coming forever.  How many managers who fill that role get more than four chances to do it? We’re in an age now where teams are taking chances on ex-players with virtually no high-level managing or coaching experience like Mike Redmond and Walt Weiss. It’s possible that Riggleman’s path would have played out exactly like this had he not quit.

All that aside, it’s a good article about a — by all reports — good guy who made one strange and unexpected decision a couple of years ago.

Jose Reyes is hitless in 20 plate appearances to start the season

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Mets backup infielder Jose Reyes pinch-hit and popped up in the top of the eighth inning of Thursday night’s game in Atlanta against the Braves. That ran his streak up to 20 consecutive hitless plate appearances to start the 2018 season. He has reached base once, however, on a walk, so there’s that.

Reyes, 34, signed a one-year, $2 million contract with the Mets near the end of January. At the time, the Mets hadn’t yet signed Todd Frazier, so Reyes was in the mix to contribute as a utilityman but he has operated as a bat off the bench for the most part this season.

One wonders how much longer the Mets are going to let Reyes flounder. According to FanGraphs, he has already been worth a half-win less than a replacement-level player. Only eight other players have been as bad or worse this season.