Jim Riggleman: paying the price for quitting

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Jorge Arangure of Sports on Earth caught up with Jim Riggleman recently. Riggleman is entering his second straight season as a minor league manager. And the reason he’s in the minor leagues is because he quit on the Washington Nationals in 2011, and as Arangure notes, baseball will forgive anything but someone who just ups and quits. Ask Mike Hargrove.

Riggleman, however, doesn’t sound like he regrets much:

“As I’ve told many people, it wasn’t the smart thing to do,” Riggleman said. “But it was thought out and it had been going for awhile, but it wasn’t the smart decision. But I thought it was the right decision. That’s the consequences sometimes. Things don’t work out perfectly as you hope. I got to live with my decision.”

I wonder if Riggleman’s fate would have been all that different if he had done the smart thing and let his contract run out with the Nationals where, no, I don’t think anyone was going to renew it. As the article notes, Riggleman was never seen by anyone as the guy to take a team to the next level. And while he has always done admirable service as a guy to take a team that is down its luck and be, well, a placeholder until it is better, those jobs don’t keep coming forever.  How many managers who fill that role get more than four chances to do it? We’re in an age now where teams are taking chances on ex-players with virtually no high-level managing or coaching experience like Mike Redmond and Walt Weiss. It’s possible that Riggleman’s path would have played out exactly like this had he not quit.

All that aside, it’s a good article about a — by all reports — good guy who made one strange and unexpected decision a couple of years ago.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.