Brian McCann could miss all of April rehabbing from shoulder surgery

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We already knew that Brian McCann wasn’t going to be ready for Opening Day after right shoulder surgery, but there’s a chance that the Braves could be without him for the entire first month of the season.

According to Mark Bowman of MLB.com, Braves general manager Frank Wren confirmed this morning that McCann will not play in a minor league game before April 16. That would put him six months removed from shoulder surgery. It’s not clear how many rehab games he’ll need to play, but it’s possible that he won’t be ready to rejoin the Braves until the end of April or perhaps later.

McCann was cleared to take batting practice at the end of February, but since he’s still building strength in his shoulder, throwing is the biggest challenge. He’s currently limited to long-toss exercises from a distance of 120 feet and isn’t ready to make strong throws down to second base.

Gerald Laird, who joined the Braves this winter on a two-year, $3 million contract, is expected to function as the primary catcher during McCann’s absence. Evan Gattis and Matt Pagnozzi are currently competing for the backup gig.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.