Tim Hudson’s eephus pitch may have had some history behind it

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This morning, Aaron posted about Braves starter Tim Hudson throwing Nationals first baseman and former Brave Adam LaRoche an “eephus” pitch in the top of the second inning during this afternoon’s Grapefruit League exhibition. Bill Ladson reported on the hijinks between the two:

“He is such a buddy of mine,” LaRoche said. “Another [time], he went to switch balls and then threw one at my head. The ball went all the way to the backstop. He likes having fun, apparently. I gave him the knuckleball signal walking up. I didn’t think he would do it. I should have known better.”

Perhaps coincidental, but Adam’s father Dave famously threw an eephus pitch in 1981 when he was with the Yankees:

Tip of the cap to /r/Baseball for the video.

Paul Jackson wrote about the pitch for ESPN back in 2008:

At a mound conference, it was nearly decided that the right-handed slugger would be pitched around, but LaRoche somehow persuaded his manager, Bob Lemon, to let him bait Thomas with four “slow curves” out of the strike zone. If the slugger laid off, he could have his free pass.

Thomas, for his part, did not want to walk. He no doubt wanted a piece of Dave LaRoche and his mediocre stuff, and the reliever obliged, throwing Thomas the slowest pitch he’d ever seen. LaLob missed outside, ball one. Lemon — who had never known a “slow curve” to rise out of view from the dugout — blinked and rubbed his eyes. Thomas, who had a much better look, nonetheless could not believe it.

Adrian Gonzalez might retire after his contract is up if his back isn’t any better

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Despite dealing with back trouble for five years, Adrian Gonzalez of the Dodgers recently made his first ever trip to the disabled list. Then he made another trip there. All of it has him contemplating his future. As he tells Bill Plunkett of the OC Register, his baseball future may be a short one if his health doesn’t improve:

“I want to get back this year to help the team and for me to be healthy,” Gonzalez said. “But I’m thinking more long-term about being able to play more years.

“Because if I have to deal with this next year again? That’ll probably be it. My contract will be over, that’ll probably be it. I won’t play any more. If I can heal it and my body feels good? Now I can go out there and do the things I can do. Then I’ll keep playing.”

Backs are one of those things that don’t get better as you get older. At least not without a lot of work and effort and good luck. Gonzalez is 35 now, so he’ll need all of that to keep playing beyond his current deal.

The Cubs send Kyle Schwarber to the minors

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Kyle Schwarber broke into the bigs in 2015 with a big bat. After missing almost all of the last season with an injury, he reemerged as a postseason hero, posting a .971 OPS in the World Series. As 2017 began he was supposed to be one of the key parts of a potent Cubs offense.

Then the baseball games actually started and he has hit a mere .171/.295/.378. Indeed, he has the lowest batting average among qualified MLB hitters in 2017. Given that he has very little if any defensive value, he has been a significant drag on the Cubs, who are just a single game over .500.

Now this:

The Cubs are also putting Jason Heyward on the disabled list, so the outfield is a bit of a mess these days. Lucky for them, they’re only trailing the Brewers by a game and a half.