The Mets outfield could be historically bad

31 Comments

ESPN’s Adam Rubin reports that Mets GM Sandy Alderson doesn’t have any plans to bolster a very weak outfield:

Sandy Alderson said there is no cavalry coming to the rescue in the outfield. That means it will be Lucas Duda, Collin Cowgill, Marlon Byrd, Mike Baxter and Jordany Valdespin in the outfield in some configuration to open the season in all likelihood, as long as Valdespin isn’t pressed into infield duty by injuries.

“We’re going to go with the guys we have,” Alderson told Newsday about the outfield.

Last season, the Mets had the fifth-worst-hitting outfield in the big leagues going by weighted on-base average (wOBA), found at FanGraphs. The average wOBA for an NL outfield last year was .327; the Mets were found at .309. Their outfield has only gotten worse.

Since 1990, only seven outfields have been so weak as to post a wOBA under .300:

Season Team OF wOBA
2010 Mariners .299
1992 Padres .299
1992 Angels .296
1993 Marlins .294
2012 Mariners .293
2012 Astros .287
2011 Mariners .276

Of the five outfielders the Mets plan to use on their 25-man roster, only Duda (.325 wOBA) is expected to have any proficiency with the bat, according to Dan Szymborski’s ZiPS projection system. It is going to be a long year in Queens.

David DeJesus retires

Harry How/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

Rich Schultz/Getty Images
4 Comments

Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.