David Wright AP

Mets officially name David Wright as team captain


We already knew this was coming at some point, but the Mets made it official this afternoon. David Wright was named the fourth captain in the team’s history, joining John Franco, Keith Hernandez and Gary Carter.

Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter and White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko are the only other active designated “captains” in the major leagues. Wright didn’t really need the title at this point since he’s clearly the face of the franchise, so it’s mostly a formality, but the honor clearly means a lot to him.

Via Andy Martino of the New York Daily News:

“This is probably one of the proudest days of my career so far,” Wright said. “To be viewed in this light, both by ownership, by Sandy and the front office, by the coaching staff, and probably most importantly by the players — It means a great deal to me, and is something that I am very appreciative of.”

And don’t worry, Wright will not be wearing a “C” on his uniform. While those C’s can look a little goofy, I’m guessing the Wilpons may have had mixed emotions about the situation, as it could have resulted in a huge spike in merchandise sales. But I’m sure they’ll find a way to make money off it somehow.

Wright, a supplemental first-round pick of the Mets in 2001, owns a .301/.381/.506 lifetime batting line and already holds the franchise record with 1,426 hits. The 30-year-old third signed an eight year, $138 million extension with the club in December which sets him up to spend his entire career with the Mets.

Clayton Kershaw does not need back surgery

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 16:  Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers stands on the pitcher's mound in the sixth inning against the Chicago Cubs during game two of the National League Championship Series at Wrigley Field on October 16, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman says thatClayton Kershaw is unlikely to need back surgery for the herniated disk that sidelined him for more than two months during the season.

Friedman says that Kershaw feels good and that he doesn’t anticipate surgery. It was unclear if that would be the case because, even as Kershaw came back in September and pitched deep into the playoffs, often on short rest, everyone was fairly tight-lipped about how Kershaw was feeling.

For what it’s worth, Kershaw looked sound mechanically, even if was up and down at times in October.

People are paying tens of thousands to get into the World Series

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 24:  Chicago Cubs fans visit Wrigley Field on October 24, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs will face off against the Cleveland Indians in the World Series beginning tomorrow. This will be the Cubs first trip to the series since 1945. The Indians last trip to the series was 1948.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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Ticket prices for the World Series are always ridiculous, but this year things are heading to a whole new ridiculous level.

Now, to be clear, some of the figures you hear are not what will be paid for tickets. The Associated Press has the de rigueur story of ticket holders asking, like, a million dollars for their tickets and ticket seekers willing to give all kinds of in-kind goods and services for a chance to see the Cubs play in Wrigley. A lot of that noise will never amount to any real transaction and, in some cases, will likely end up with someone getting arrested. It’s crazy time, you know.

But even if those million dollar and sex-for-tickets stories end up being more smoke than fire, people will end up paying astronomical prices to get in. Some already are. ESPN’s Darren Rovell reports that someone paid $32,000 on StubHub for 4 seats in the front row by the Cubs visitors dugout for Game 2 at Progressive Field in Cleveland. The prices in Wrigley Field for Games 3, 4 and, if necessary, 5 will likely go higher. There’s a ton of pent-up demand on the part of both Cubs and Indians fans, after all.

Still: trying to imagine how an in-stadium experience, no matter how long someone has been waiting for it, is worth that kind of scratch. Guess it all depends on whether that kind of money constitutes that kind of scratch for a given person.