Kyle Lohse wants Ryan Dempster money

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Kyle Lohse turned down a one-year, $13.3 million qualifying offer from the Cardinals last November in hopes that he would find a lucrative multi-year deal in free agency. And after posting a 3.11 ERA from 2011-2012, there was every reason to think that someone would bite, even with the draft pick compensation attached. However, with Opening Day just a week and a half away, the 34-year-old right-hander is still out there waiting for the right offer to come along. And his asking price has gone down.

While Jeff Passan of Yahoo! Sports hears that Lohse was still asking for a three-year, $45 million deal one week into spring training, FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal reports that he’s now hoping to at least match the two-year, $26.5 million deal Ryan Dempster signed with the Red Sox over the winter. That’s a pretty steep drop from what many expected he would get at the start of free agency, but it remains to be seen whether anyone thinks a two-year deal is worth surrendering a draft pick.

The Rangers and Brewers remain in contact with Lohse, but Rosenthal hears that the Rockies have also done their “due diligence.” It’s worth noting that Colorado’s first-round pick is protected by virtue of their 64-98 record last year, but they are already stretched budget-wise and Rosenthal was told that it would only happen “if by a very, very remote chance he just flat-out doesn’t have anything.” Lohse may also be reluctant to sign with the Rockies since Coors Field is by far the toughest ballpark in the majors to pitch in. The wait continues.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: