Roy Oswalt is working out at Mississippi State University and hoping to join a contender soon

21 Comments

Tim Dierkes of MLB Trade Rumors reports that free agent right-hander Roy Oswalt is working out at Mississippi State University and aiming to catch on with a new team at some point in the near future.

Oswalt’s agent, Bob Garber of RMG Baseball, told Dierkes that Oswalt isn’t worried about geography like he was last year — when he would only accept offers from the Rangers and Cardinals. But Oswalt does want to pitch for a contender and is open to working as a reliever if it’s an attractive situation.

Oswalt posted a 5.80 ERA and 1.53 WHIP in 59 innings (nine starts, eight relief appearances) last season for Texas. Teams haven’t exactly been lining up for the 35-year-old this winter, but maybe he’ll get a call as Opening Day approaches from an organization in desperate need of last-minute pitching depth.

Garber told Dierkes that returning to the Astros is something Oswalt wants to do before he retires.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.