Roger Goodell, Commissioner of the NFL, speaks at a news conference announcing the Head Health Initiative, a collaboration between GE and the NFL, in New York

One man’s solution to the Baltimore scheduling conflict: total capitulation by the weak and feeble baseball people!

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There are those who speak truth to power. Then there are those who cover the powerful and revel in that power as if it is some extension of their own power. Man, those folks are truly pathetic:

When it comes to being a sheriff – or, at least, playing one on TV – Roger Goodell has few peers in professional sports … And with all due (dis)respect to the displaced national pastime, it’s time for the Sheriff of Park Avenue to walk all over Selig, his MLB counterpart.

That’s Yahoo!’s football writer Michael Silver, whose argument for solving the Orioles/Ravens scheduling conflict mentioned earlier today is basically thus:

  • The NFL is strong and popular.
  • Major League Baseball is weak an unpopular.
  • The powerful and popular NFL should do whatever the hell it wants to and ignore the puny MLB.
  • When it does so, no courtesy should be extended MLB. Rather, Roger Goodell should flex his popular and powerful muscles.

I’m not even exaggerating. Check this out:

Does Selig seriously think he’s going to win this battle against the NFL, a league which dwarfs his in popularity and which has conspicuously refrained from flaunting its superiority? … The NFL could easily bully baseball, but for the most part, that doesn’t happen.

He ultimately tells Bud Selig that he should “take some money from Uncle Roger’s slush fund” move the game and come watch the Ravens game himself because that’s what God and Nature intended. And that the NFL should make no accommodations to baseball because, well, why should it?

Know what? In this instance I imagine something like that actually will happen. I bet the O’s-White Sox game gets moved and money is exchanged. But that’s sort of beside the point.

Because at the moment I’m mostly amazed at how many jollies this apparently professional journalist is getting by being on the same side of an issue as the Great and Mighty Roger Goodell, and I’m wondering how being enthralled with that power translates to his critical analysis of whatever else the NFL chooses to do.

The Padres are aggressively shopping Yangervis Solarte

PHOENIX, AZ - OCTOBER 01:  Third baseman Yangervis Solarte #26 of the San Diego Padres fields a ground ball against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the sixth inning of a MLB game at Chase Field on October 1, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Ralph Freso/Getty Images)
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In a column published on Sunday, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports says the Padres are “aggressively shopping” third baseman Yangervis Solarte. The 29-year-old is entering his first of three years of arbitration eligibility and is projected to earn $2.7 million next season.

This past season, Solarte hit a solid .286/.341/.467 with 15 home runs and 71 RBI in 443 plate appearances. It’s quite impressive factoring in that he plays in the pitcher-friendly Petco Park.

Given that Solarte is team-controlled for three more years and he offers lots of versatility with previous experience playing first and second base as well as corner outfield, the Padres should receive a fair amount of interest.

Yankees sign Matt Holliday to a one-year, $13 million deal

ST. LOUIS, MO - JULY 20: Matt Holliday #7 of the St. Louis Cardinal hits a solo home run during the second inning against the San Diego Padres of game one of a doubleheader at Busch Stadium on July 20, 2016 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Scott Kane/Getty Images)
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Update (6:52 PM EST): The deal is expected to be one year for $13 million, per Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports. Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports confirms the report.

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The Yankees are close to signing veteran free agent Matt Holliday, WFAN’s Sweeny Murti reports.

Holliday, who turns 37 years old next month, was limited to 110 games in 2016 with the Cardinals due to a fractured left thumb suffered in the second half. He finished the season hitting .246/.322/.461 with 20 home runs and 62 RBI in 426 plate appearances.

Holliday is likely looking at spending the majority of his time in the DH role. Alex Rodriguez, Carlos Beltran, and Brian McCann handled the DH role for a majority of the time last season but all three have moved on — Rodriguez was released in the second half, Beltran just signed with the Astros, and McCann was traded to the Astros last month.