Rays reassign prospect outfielder Wil Myers to minor league camp

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The centerpiece of the trade that sent right-hander James Shields to the Royals will begin the 2013 season in the minor leagues.

The Rays announced this morning that top prospect outfielder Wil Myers was reassigned to minor league camp. The 22-year-old batted .300 (9-for-30) with a triple, three doubles and an RBI in 15 games during Grapefruit League action.

Myers has been expected to begin the season with Triple-A Durham all along. And while Rays fans are anxious to see him, the timing of his major league debut has some major financial implications. Keeping him in the minors for even a few weeks would delay his free agency by a year, similar to how the Nationals handled Bryce Harper last year. If the Rays wait until around mid-June to call him up, it would keep him from being a “Super Two” player and having four years of arbitration eligibility as opposed to the usual three. Of course, his contract situation could be rendered moot if the Rays are somehow able to sign him to a long-term deal similar to Evan Longoria and Matt Moore, but Marc Topkin of the St. Petersburg Times hears that Myers hasn’t been approached with any offers yet.

Myers, 22, batted .314/.387/.600 with 37 home runs and a .987 OPS between Double-A Northwest Arkansas and Triple-A Omaha last year. Baseball America recently ranked him as the No. 4 prospect in the game on their annual Top 100 list.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.