Carlos Gomez gets $24 million extension from Brewers

24 Comments

Carlos Gomez and the Brewers have agreed to a three-year, $24 million contract extension, the team announced.

Gomez is making $4.3 million this season in his final year of arbitration eligibility and would have hit the open market as a free agent next winter. Instead according to Adam McCalvy of MLB.com he’ll get $7 million in 2014, $8 million in 2015, and $9 million in 2016.

Gomez was once a top prospect, but looked like a bust before a career-year at the plate in 2012. He hit .260 with 19 homers and 37 steals in 137 games while posting a .768 OPS that’s 90 points higher than his previous best mark, although Gomez’s awful plate discipline and strike-zone control remained with a 98/20 K/BB ratio. Overall, with both offense and defense factored in, he was probably a top-10 center fielder.

Clearly the Brewers are either buying into last season’s power development sticking around for good or simply believe his excellent range in center field makes Gomez an above-average player regardless of whether he regresses at the plate. Three years and $24 million is a big commitment to someone with a .673 career OPS, but elite defensive center fielders don’t have to hit much to provide big value and $7-$9 million per season isn’t exactly superstar money these days. Depending on how far you trust various defensive metrics, Gomez was worth about twice that much last season.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

Getty Images
3 Comments

Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.