Jordany Valdespin wasn’t wearing a cup when he was hit … there yesterday

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If you’re surprised or disappointed that I’ve managed to squeeze three posts out of a guy getting hit in the do-re-mi with a Justin Verlander fastball, well, you’re just not familiar with my work. But really, this needs to be highlighted:

The Mets utilityman exited yesterday’s exhibition game against the Tigers after he was hit in the genitals with a Justin Verlander 94-mph fastball, and left club officials shaking their heads by revealing he wasn’t wearing a protective cup.

“You would think if you are starting at second base, you would be smart enough to wear a cup,” manager Terry Collins fumed to The Post after the Mets’ 11-0 victory at Joker Marchant Stadium.

Man. I felt like I should have been wearing a cup at a couple of spring training games last week I was so close to the action. If I was playing in the infield I’d probably want a suit of armor.

Anyway, I’m still a bit surprised that most of the responses to this are about the cup and about Valdespin’s postgame comments. Isn’t the important lesson here that Jordany Valdespin’s junk must be made of Kevlar for him to walk away from this incident unscathed?

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.