Vin Scully called Game 7 of the World Series and then went on a date with “Sesame Street” creator

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Vin Scully is set to begin his 64th season announcing Dodgers games and the greatest broadcaster in baseball history shared a lot of great stuff during an interview with Lyle Spencer of MLB.com.

My favorite part, which Jon Weisman of the must-read Dodger Thoughts alerted me to, is that on the night the Dodgers won Game 7 of the World Series in 1955 a then 28-year-old Scully’s postgame plans involved going out on a date:

I had a date, and I left the group to get my car and go pick her up. We drove over to Brooklyn for the party at the Bossert Hotel. It was like V-J Day and V-E Day rolled into one when we came out of the tunnel. There were thousands of people on the sidewalks leading to the hotel. There were policemen, and parking attendants who took your car about a block from the hotel. Walking down that street to the hotel, that was an unforgettable scene.

Her name was Joan Ganz. She was from Arizona. I’m pretty sure she later became the creator of “Sesame Street.” You can check on that. We liked each other and stayed in touch, but it never got serious. I haven’t told this story, but what the heck. That was a long time ago.

First of all, as you’d expect Scully’s memory is spot on. Joan Ganz (who later became Joan Ganz Cooney) created “Sesame Street.” She also was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Hall of Fame. Oh, and she won a Presidential Medal of Freedom too. She’s probably one of the most influential people in television history.

Imagine how many incredible stories Vin Scully has that makes “I once dated the woman who created ‘Sesame Street’ after calling Game 7 of the 1955 World Series” not even worth telling for 58 years.

“I haven’t told this story, but what the heck.”

Roberto Osuna reveals he has been dealing with an anxiety issue

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Blue Jays closer Roberto Osuna recently revealed that he has been dealing with an anxiety issue, Rob Longley of the Toronto Star reports. Osuna specified that the issue is completely off the field, not on the field. He is not sure when he’ll be able to return to pitch again.

Osuna had been feeling “a little bit anxious, a little bit weird” and said, “I feel like I’m lost a little bit right now.” Despite the anxiety, Osuna volunteered to pitch during Friday’s loss to the Royals, but the Blue Jays smartly chose not to put him into the game.

Osuna said, “I wish I knew how to get out of here and how to get out of this. We’re working on it. We’re trying to find ways to see what can make me feel better. But to be honest I just don’t know.”

It must have been tough for Osuna to make his issue public, as there is still a stigma around dealing with mental issues. Given the prominent position he holds in the Jays’ bullpen, fans become even less empathetic about taking time off to deal with it as well. Hopefully, Osuna is able to use the time off to get the help he needs. And hopefully his going public helps motivate other people dealing with mental issues to seek help for themselves.

The 22-year-old recently became the youngest player in major league history to reach 75 career saves. This season, Osuna is carrying a 2.48 ERA with 19 saves and a 37/3 K/BB ratio in 39 innings.

Brewers claim Stephen Vogt off waivers from the Athletics

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reported on Sunday that the Brewers claimed catcher Stephen Vogt off waivers from the Athletics. Vogt was designated for assignment by the Athletics on Thursday.

Vogt, 32, was an All-Star in each of the last two seasons, but struggled this year. He hit .217/.287/.357 with four home runs and 20 RBI in 174 plate appearances.

With the Brewers, Vogt will likely split time behind the plate with Manny Pina. Meanwhlie, the Athletics’ catching situation will be handled by Josh Phegley and Bruce Maxwell.