Larry Walker “saw Satan” in the eyes of Alfredo Aceves

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Canada defeated Mexico 10-3 in today’s World Baseball Classic Pool D match-up, but that wasn’t the most talked-about result from the game — it was the fracas that started in the ninth inning. With his team up six runs, Canada’s Chris Robinson led off the top-half of the inning with a bunt, which infuriated Mexico, thinking that the WBC operates under similar rules as Major League Baseball. However, where the WBC differs is that they use run differential in their tie-breaker, so all efforts to eke out that extra run, whether by bunting or stealing bases up by more runs than can be counted on one hand, are justifiable. Not knowing this, Mexico reliever Arnold Leon threw at Rene Tosoni with his first pitch of the next at-bat, causing both benches to empty and punches to be thrown.

Those involved in the brawl included Mexico’s Luis Cruz, Eduardo Arredondo and Alfredo Aceves, as well as Canada’s Tyson Gillies and Scott Mathieson. Canada first base coach Larry Walker was involved as well, and says he saw Satan in the eyes of his attacker.

Walker also had baseball’s best interest in mind, pulling Mexico star first baseman Adrian Gonzalez out of the gathering.

Walker had some other interesting thoughts on the brawl, saying that CBC hockey commentator Don Cherry “can’t wait” to put the baseball brawl on his Hockey Night in Canada program. He never was one for a dull moment.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.