Ned Yost is taking spring training very seriously

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Pete Grathoff’s article in the Kansas City Star is mostly about how the Royals are giving infielders Chris Getz and Johnny Giavotella some reps in the outfield to increase their versatility, but buried within that is this little tidbit and quote from manager Ned Yost:

This was going to happen earlier, but the Royals were just playing too well. …

“It’s not an experiment, but we want guys to be versatile, and those guys, we think, can handle it,” Yost said before Thursday’s 12-2 loss to the Mariners. “I was waiting until we lost a game before I started experimenting a little bit, but what the hell, we’d better just go ahead and start doing it.”

He means a spring training game, just to be clear. As in, Yost didn’t want to start giving players action at new positions while the team was on a spring training winning streak in early March. Kansas City is an MLB-best 11-1 this spring, but based on how seriously they’re apparently taking Cactus League wins and losses Royals fans might be getting set up for disappointment once the games actually count.

If you’re curious, last year’s best spring training record belonged to the Blue Jays at 24-7 and they went 73-89 in the regular season. And two years ago the Royals–with Yost as their manager–had the best spring training winning percentage and they went 71-91.

Might as well do whatever you want in spring training games, because the wins and losses don’t really matter.

The Rays announce “The Rays Tank.” Really.

Tampa Bay Rays
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Earlier this offseason the Rays traded away franchise player Evan Longoria. Over the weekend they traded starter Jake Odorizzi to the Twins and designated All-Star outfielder Corey Dickerson for assignment. These were clearly financially driven moves, and now the Rays sport a payroll of less than $70 million. The club’s offseason moves prompted Longoria to say that he feels sorry for Rays fans.

If you asked Rays brass, I’m sure they’d make strong statements defending all of these moves while offering evidence-light arguments that, yes, they truly are interested in fielding a competitive team in 2018. They would likely react VERY angrily to any suggestion that they are tanking this year. Teams never admit that they’re tanking.

In other news, the Rays announced a new blog:

Oh.