Revisiting the death of a Nationals prospect two years later

8 Comments

Almost two years have passed since 18-year-old Nationals prospect Yewri Guillen died from a brain infection while playing and living at the team’s baseball academy in the Dominican Republic.

Ian Gordon of Mother Jones wrote a lengthy article about Guillen’s life and his death, and how it all relates to the process of MLB teams signing teenagers from foreign countries.

A lot of it is really sad stuff, including the fact that Guillen was refused treatment at a private hospital a week before his death when his family couldn’t afford the admission fee.

And then there’s this, regarding MLB’s insistence that proper health protocols were followed:

There wasn’t a certified athletic trainer, let alone a doctor, to evaluate Guillén at the Nationals’ academy, a spartan training camp with cinder-block dorms. No one from the team accompanied him to Santo Domingo or intervened when he couldn’t get into the Clínica Abreu. (The club didn’t cover the costs of his treatment until after he was admitted to the Cuban-Dominican clinic.) And following Guillén’s death, the club required his parents to sign a release before handing over his signing bonus and life insurance money—a document also stating that they would never sue the team or its employees.

Gordon’s article goes on to detail some of the living conditions teenage prospects like Guillen deal with and how, for the most part, the issues are ignored by MLB and mainstream media. I’m sure MLB’s side of the story is much different, of course, but I definitely think the article is worth reading for a look inside a mostly uncovered part of the baseball world.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

Associated Press
Leave a comment

Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.