Nate Robertson

Nate Robertson: throwing sidearm “is a rebirth for my career”

6 Comments

Nate Robertson averaged 31 starts a year for the Tigers between 2004-2008, but he hasn’t appeared in the majors since 2010. He’s now 35 years-old and he’s fresh off a season where he posted an 8.07 ERA and 20/8 K/BB ratio over 29 innings for two different Triple-A teams. He even threw part of the season for the independent Wichita Wingnuts.

Usually that sort of thing means the end of one’s career or, at the very least, some serious soul-searching about it all. But Robertson is not giving up. He’s here in Rangers camp and, after speaking with him this morning, it’s fair to say that he’s feeling fantastic. The reason, as I mentioned earlier, was that he is a totally different pitcher. He’s now throwing sidearm.

“It’s a rebirth for my career,” Robertson told me. “I’m getting the kind of movement I used to have when I was young but lost when I got hurt.”

Robertson said that, at times, he’s surprised how much movement he gets from dropping down two a three-quarter arm slot. Indeed, it’s a far greater adjustment for him to get a sense of where the increased action will send his pitches than it was to make the actual physical change from going overhand to sidearm.

From a mechanics standpoint Robertson seems like a guy who has been throwing sidearm for his whole career. He’ll still occasionally mix in some overhand stuff, but he’s moving to a point where, he says, he’ll be exclusively throwing from the three-quarters slot. The HardballTalk Scouting Department (i.e. my girlfriend and her iPhone)– took this video of him in the bullpen on Saturday before entering the game against the Diamondbacks. He looks pretty free and easy:

The results, insofar as they matter in spring training, have been good. He’s thrown three innings without allowing a run. And, more importantly, without walking anyone. Not too bad for a guy who literally taught himself how to do this.

I asked him if, since he’s gotten into camp, there was anyone around to help him refine his approach. He said that while there aren’t any sidearmers around, he pointed across the clubhouse to Kenny Rogers and said “he used to throw the ball from all over the damn place” so from a standpoint of changing things up, Rogers has been a valuable resource. Otherwise, Robertson says, he’s still on his own.

My last question to Robertson was how the new delivery has him feeling the next morning. He said it’s amazing how great he feels the day after pitching now compared to when he threw overhand.  I asked him if it would be weird to be one of those guys who transforms from an injured starter to one of those rubber-armed dudes who throw 80 games a year. He smiled from ear to ear and said “That would be it, man. After all of this, that would be the best.”

It’s not at all clear that Robertson will make the Rangers. But if he doesn’t, he’s got things to showcase for other teams in need of a bullpen arm. And even if that doesn’t work out, he’s at least going out fighting, and I get the sense that that’s what most players would want.

The Rangers release Josh Hamilton

ARLINGTON, TX - OCTOBER 4: Josh Hamilton #32 of the Texas Rangers reacts after scoring a run on a Elvis Andrus RBI double during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels at Globe Life Park on October 4, 2015 in Arlington, Texas. Texas won 9-2 and won the AL West Title. (Photo by Brandon Wade/Getty Images)
2 Comments

Welp, it was probably worth the gamble given that the Angels were paying most of his salary. But the Rangers’ gamble on Josh Hamilton failed and now Josh Hamilton is a free agent. The club has given him unconditional release waivers.

Hamilton underwent surgery to repair lateral and meniscus cartilage in his left knee back in June. During surgery it was discovered that he had an ACL injury as well, which required reconstruction. This whole season was lost and, while Hamilton has one year remaining on his contract, the Rangers are clearly able to compete without him and could use the roster spot over the small chance that he could be an everyday player again.

Hamilton will earn $30 million next season, $26.41 million of which is being paid for by the Angels. Last year in 182 plate appearances with the Rangers, Hamilton hit .253/.291/.441 with eight home runs and 25 RBI. At age 35, it’s not hard to imagine that his major league career is effectively over.

 

The Yankees offer to pay for Doc Gooden’s rehab

FLUSHING, NY - UNDATED:  Dwight Gooden #16 of the New York Mets delivers a pitch during a game at Shea Stadium circa 1984-1994 in Flushing, New York.  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
Getty Images
3 Comments

With the continuing caveat that it is really weird and likely as uncomfortable as hell for all of those involved for this to be playing out so publicly, here is the latest news on the Doc Gooden/Daryl Strawberry/possible cocaine relapse story. From the Daily News:

Dwight (Doc) Gooden is insisting publicly that he doesn’t have a drug problem, yet more and more people want to help him — none more significant than the Yankees, who have reached out to say they’ll pay for any treatment he would consider getting.

That’s admirable of the Yankees, as is their refusal to comment on it further (the Daily News got this info from Strawberry). The Yankees, of course, gave both Strawberry and Gooden second chances in the 1990s when their addiction problems threatened their careers.