Nate Robertson

Nate Robertson: throwing sidearm “is a rebirth for my career”

6 Comments

Nate Robertson averaged 31 starts a year for the Tigers between 2004-2008, but he hasn’t appeared in the majors since 2010. He’s now 35 years-old and he’s fresh off a season where he posted an 8.07 ERA and 20/8 K/BB ratio over 29 innings for two different Triple-A teams. He even threw part of the season for the independent Wichita Wingnuts.

Usually that sort of thing means the end of one’s career or, at the very least, some serious soul-searching about it all. But Robertson is not giving up. He’s here in Rangers camp and, after speaking with him this morning, it’s fair to say that he’s feeling fantastic. The reason, as I mentioned earlier, was that he is a totally different pitcher. He’s now throwing sidearm.

“It’s a rebirth for my career,” Robertson told me. “I’m getting the kind of movement I used to have when I was young but lost when I got hurt.”

Robertson said that, at times, he’s surprised how much movement he gets from dropping down two a three-quarter arm slot. Indeed, it’s a far greater adjustment for him to get a sense of where the increased action will send his pitches than it was to make the actual physical change from going overhand to sidearm.

From a mechanics standpoint Robertson seems like a guy who has been throwing sidearm for his whole career. He’ll still occasionally mix in some overhand stuff, but he’s moving to a point where, he says, he’ll be exclusively throwing from the three-quarters slot. The HardballTalk Scouting Department (i.e. my girlfriend and her iPhone)– took this video of him in the bullpen on Saturday before entering the game against the Diamondbacks. He looks pretty free and easy:

The results, insofar as they matter in spring training, have been good. He’s thrown three innings without allowing a run. And, more importantly, without walking anyone. Not too bad for a guy who literally taught himself how to do this.

I asked him if, since he’s gotten into camp, there was anyone around to help him refine his approach. He said that while there aren’t any sidearmers around, he pointed across the clubhouse to Kenny Rogers and said “he used to throw the ball from all over the damn place” so from a standpoint of changing things up, Rogers has been a valuable resource. Otherwise, Robertson says, he’s still on his own.

My last question to Robertson was how the new delivery has him feeling the next morning. He said it’s amazing how great he feels the day after pitching now compared to when he threw overhand.  I asked him if it would be weird to be one of those guys who transforms from an injured starter to one of those rubber-armed dudes who throw 80 games a year. He smiled from ear to ear and said “That would be it, man. After all of this, that would be the best.”

It’s not at all clear that Robertson will make the Rangers. But if he doesn’t, he’s got things to showcase for other teams in need of a bullpen arm. And even if that doesn’t work out, he’s at least going out fighting, and I get the sense that that’s what most players would want.

Red Sox could go to arbitration hearing with Fernando Abad

BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 16:  Fernando Abad #58 of the Boston Red Sox pitches against the New York Yankees during the ninth inning at Fenway Park on September 16, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Red Sox are expecting to go to an arbitration hearing with left-handed reliever Fernando Abad, per Pete Abraham of the Boston Globe. Red Sox president Dave Dombrowski said there was a “decent chance” a hearing would be necessary after countering Abad’s $2.7 million request with $2 million.

Abad, 31, pitched just 12 2/3 innings for Boston after the club acquired him from Minnesota at the trade deadline last season. The lefty earned a cumulative 3.66 ERA, 4.2 BB/9 and 7.9 SO/9 for the two teams in 2016. He received $1.25 million in 2016 and will remain under club control (through arbitration) in 2017. A $2.7 million salary would be a hefty increase for the veteran reliever, who has seen a significant decline since he put up a 1.57 ERA for the Athletics in 2014 and who has not amassed more than 0.6 fWAR in any single season to date.

While the Red Sox aren’t close to settling with Abad, Evan Drellich of the Boston Herald reports that they may be closing in on a settlement with left-handed starter Drew Pomeranz. Pomeranz filed at $5.7 million, while the Sox felt more comfortable at $3.6 million. The two are expected to meet somewhere in the middle to avoid an arbitration hearing later this winter.

Report: Braves sign Kurt Suzuki

KANSAS CITY, MO - AUGUST 20: Kurt Suzuki #8 of the Minnesota Twins hits against the Kansas City Royals at Kauffman Stadium on August 20, 2016 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
Getty Images
1 Comment

The Braves reportedly have a deal in place with free agent catcher Kurt Suzuki, per Chris Cotillo of SB Nation. FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal adds that the contract is for one year, $1.5 million with up to $2.5 million in additional incentives.

Suzuki, 33, completed a three-year track with the Twins in 2016, slashing .258/.301/.403 with eight home runs in 373 PA. The veteran backstop likely won’t provide an offensive or defensive upgrade over current starter Tyler Flowers, but should give the Braves some depth at a position they’ve been looking to strengthen since the start of the offseason.

The team has yet to confirm the deal.