City of San Jose could sue San Francisco Giants

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Well, this is interesting. San Jose has been an oft-discussed new locale for the Oakland Athletics if they were to move, but the San Francisco Giants have been a thorn in their paw, so to speak. San Jose may be ready to flip the script.

Sam Liccardo, the San Jose CityCouncil member whose district includes most of the proposed downtown ballpark property, wants the city to sue the Giants. They continue to claim territorial rights to the South Bay and, empowered by Major League Baseball’s antitrust exemption, have used that claim to block the A’s quest at every turn.

Liccardo’s strategy, if affirmed by his council colleagues, could be a game-changer. It would be a cunning reverse twist on the Giants’ own veiled (and nonveiled) threats to pursue legal action against San Jose and other entities if the A’s are allowed to move south.

“The concern that seems to be broadly discussed is about litigation on behalf of the San Francisco Giants,” Liccardo said the other day at his City Hall office. “But the San Francisco Giants should become concerned about the threat of a lawsuit by the city of San Jose.”

Liccardo goes on to say that a “conservative” estimate of the financial benefit of San Jose hosting a baseball team would be in the neighborhood of $30 million over 30 years.

Oakland has finished in the bottom-five among all 30 Major League teams in average attendance dating back to 2006, including finishing dead last in 2009 and 2011. Their ballpark, the O.co Coliseum, is 46 years old and is the last remaining multi-purpose stadium as it plays home to both the A’s and the Raiders. A move, which would include a new stadium, could provide a significant windfall to one of baseball’s poorer teams.

Alex Dickerson to miss 2017 season after undergoing back surgery

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Padres’ outfielder Alex Dickerson won’t see PETCO Park anytime soon — at least, not as its starting left fielder. The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a bulging disc in his lower back prior to the start of the 2017 season, and hasn’t made any kind of substantial progress in the months since. According to Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune, he suffered a setback in his recovery process last week and is set to undergo a season-ending discectomy next Wednesday.

Over 285 plate appearances, Dickerson batted .257/.333/.455 with 10 home runs and a .788 OPS for the Padres in 2016. He missed several days with a right hip contusion last July, but hasn’t experienced any substantial health problems since undergoing surgery in 2014 to repair a torn ligament in his left ankle.

The expected recovery period for lower back surgery is 3-4 months, according to Lin, which puts Dickerson’s estimated return just a few days before the end of the regular season. The Padres aren’t scraping the bottom of the NL West, but their 29-44 record doesn’t bode well for a postseason run this year. Assuming Dickerson rehabs his back in a timely manner, he should be in fine form to enter the competition for left field next spring.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.