Scott Proctor blames alcohol, not overuse, for his downfall

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In camp with the Giants after spending last year in Korea, Scott Proctor told the San Francisco Chronicle’s Henry Schulman that his collapse was more about his struggles with alchoholism than arm problems caused by Joe Torre’s rough handling of him.

“I think some things that happened and some poor choices on how I lived my life led to it more than anything,” he said.

Part of that was not eating right or sleeping enough, the basics of being a good athlete, but that was not the killer. He said he had a “serious drinking problem,” a binge drinker who stopped when he ran out of booze or passed out.

Proctor is the last major league reliever to throw 100 innings, ending up at 102 1/3 in a league-high 83 appearances for Torre’s Yankees in 2006. Not as effective the next year, he was traded to the Dodgers over the summer. Still, he made 83 appearances for the second straight season in 2007, covering 86 1/3 innings.

Proctor and Torre reunited in Los Angeles for the 2008 season, but it didn’t last long. Proctor’s elbow started acting up, putting him on the DL in June, and while he tried to keep pitching, he was forced to have Tommy John surgery in May 2009. He returned to struggle in spot duty in 2010 and ’11 before going to Korea. In total, he has a 6.59 ERA in 86 major league appearances since the beginning of 2008.

Proctor did have a successful season in Korea last year, saving 35 games with a 1.79 ERA. He says he’s perfected the splitter he used to throw in majors on occasion, and he’s thrown two scoreless innings for the Giants so far this spring.

More importantly, he says he’s been sober for four years now. He’ll open to accepting a Triple-A assignment should he fail to make the Giants, so it seems likely that we’ll see him back in the majors again at some point.

Jered Weaver announces his retirement

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Jered Weaver, a 12-year big league veteran and a three-time All-Star, has announced his retirement.

Weaver was struggling mightily with the Padres this year, going 0-5 in nine starts and posting a 7.44 ERA,, a 2.6 BB/9 and 4.9 K/9 ratio over 42.1 innings. He hadn’t posted a sub-4.00 ERA since 2014 and his velocity had, quite famously, sunk into the low 80s and even high 70s at times in recent seasons. A spate of physical setbacks contributed to that, with a hip inflammation ailing him this season and nerve issues in his neck and back afflicting him for the past few years.

But even if his recent seasons have been less-than-memorable, it’s worth remembering that he was, for a time, one of baseball’s best pitchers. He posted a record of 131-69 with a 3.28 ERA in his first 9 seasons, leading the American League in strikeouts in 2010 and leading the circuit in wins in 2012 and 2014. He likewise led the league in WHIP and hits allowed per nine innings in 2012.

He finishes his career with a record of 150-98, an ERA of 3.63 (ERA+ of 111) and a K/BB ratio of 1,621/551 in 2,067.1 innings. He pitched in four American League Division Series and the 2009 ALCS, posting a 2.67 ERA in seven playoff games pitched.

Happy trails, Jered. A first-ballot induction into the Hall of He Was Really Dang Good, Even if We Forgot About It For A While is in your future.

The Jose Fernandez statue may be in jeopardy

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Last November it was reported that the Marlins planned to build a memorial for Jose Fernandez, likely including a statue. The effort was said to be a pet project of the Marlins owner, Jeff Loria, who was close with Fernandez.

Today the Miami Herald reports, however, that those plans are in limbo due to the sale of the team:

The planned statue to honor Jose Fernandez, which was departing owner Jeffrey Loria’s idea, is now very much in question because it will not be erected before Bruce Sherman and Derek Jeter take over, and it will ultimately be the new owners’ call. That matter has not yet been discussed, with the sale agreed to only in the past few days.

There’s nothing in the report suggesting that they’re opposed to the statue — it’s possible this was placed in the Herald by people close to the new group in order to test the waters — but there always was the sense that the idea was something of a priority for Loria personally. One wonders how much momentum it will have once he’s gone.

Then, of course, there’s the fact that Fernandez was eventually found to have been under the influence of alcohol and cocaine and was behind the wheel of the boat at the time of the accident that claimed his life and the life of two others, making any memorial to him suspect in the eyes of some people.

Thankfully we don’t spend a lot of time and energy discussing the ethics of statues in this country, so I’m sure it’ll have no bearing on the matter.