Adam Jones: “I’m going after Cal”

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Orioles outfielder Adam Jones played in all 162 games last season, the first Oriole to do so since Miguel Tejada in 2006. Speaking to reporters, Jones joked that he was going after Cal Ripken Jr’s all-time record of 2,632 consecutive games played.

“I’m going to break Cal [Ripken, Jr.’s] record,” Jones joked. “I’m going after Cal. Cal is in my sights. Sixteen more years. But that’s my goal. If I show up at the ballpark, I’d rather play than sit. I’d rather play than have a day off. That’s just my mentality.”

Jones will be playing for Team USA in the World Baseball Classic, an event that brings with it an increased risk of injury for participating players. In preparation, Jones focused more on his lower body during the off-season. Jones said, “I made sure that I trained my legs for this WBC because I know the biggest concern is the health risks, the issues.”

Jones hopes to build off of a career year in 2012. The center fielder hit a career-best 32 home runs and posted an .839 OPS, the first time in his career he crossed the .800 threshold.

When manager Buck Showalter was asked if he would allow his center fielder to play 162 games this season, he said, “No, he won’t play 162. But don’t hold me to it.”

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.