Joba Chamberlain thinks he can start

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A couple of years back one of the hottest controversies around was whether Joba Chamberlain should be a starter or a reliever. The thinking of many was that he had amazing stuff and a history of starting in the minors so why not make him a starter?  Others, enamored with his initial callup as a lights-out reliever in 2007 thought that you had to make him a reliever and maybe, eventually, the heir to Mariano Rivera’s job as closer.

The Yankees went back and forth on the matter. Which is a nice way of saying Chamberlain was jerked around. Eventually, however, injuries and inconsistency left him in the pen, seemingly to stay. And seemingly to everyone’s contentment.

But maybe not Chamberlain’s. Because today he told Mark Feinsand of the Daily News that he would like to start:

“This is probably going to spark a bunch of stuff and (Yankees PR director Jason) Zillo is going to be mad at me, but it’s one of those things where it’s like, do you think you have the capability to start? Yes. Do I have four pitches that I can throw for a strike? Yes. Do I have two plus pitches in the bullpen that I can throw at any time? Yes.

Chamberlain says he feel he can start and that he could do it “somewhere — wherever that’s at.” Which you figure is a signal to teams who may be interested when he hits free agency after this season.

This being the Yankees this will likely cause a stir for a couple of days.

Marlins, Mariners are “fairly close” on a trade for David Phelps

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Jon Morosi reports that the Mariners and the Marlins are “fairly close” on a trade that would send reliever David Phelps to Seattle. Earlier Ken Rosenthal and others reported that the sides were talking, but that a deal was not imminent.

Phelps, 30, had a fantastic 2016 season, posting a 2.28 ERA in 64 games while striking out 11.8 batters per nine innings. He’s not been as strong this year, but he’s still been a solid setup man, posting a 3.45 ERA in 44 games while striking out 51 batters and walking 21 in 47 innings. He throws in the mid-90s and induces grounders. Basically everything you want in a reliever, right?

The Mariners could probably use rotation help more than bullpen help, but solid innings are solid innings at one point and improving your pen takes some of the pressure off of your rotation.

 

Corey Seager has more homers than any other shortstop in Los Angeles Dodgers history

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Corey Sager homered in the Dodgers’ win over the White Sox last night. It was his 45th career homer, 44 of which have come while playing shortstop. While that’s great given that the guy has only played in 270 games, it’s not a lot of homers in an absolute sense. Thousands of players have more homers than that, obviously. Baseball has been around for a long time!

But it’s enough to set a record. A Los Angeles Dodgers record, specifically, for the most homers from a shortstop. It puts Seager past Rafael Furcal, who hit 43 while wearing Dodger blue. The record for the franchise, including Brooklyn, is Pee Wee Reese, who hit 122.

It seems astounding that no other Dodgers shortstop has hit more than 44 homers in the nearly 60 years since the club has been in Los Angeles, but it’s true. If you had asked me before I saw the factoid mentioned on Twitter I would’ve bet my life that Bill Russell would’ve had more. Not because he had any power — he was, in fact, one of the more punchless players of his era — but because he simply played in L.A. so long, logging 1,746 games at short for Walt Alston and Tommy Lasorda. Nope. He only hit 46 in his 18-year career, with a handful of those coming as an outfielder. His season high is seven. Seager has hit seven homers in May of his rookie season.

Oh well, you learn something new every day.