Jeff Loria speaks unscripted, doesn’t do too much better

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For the first time in months, Jeff Loria met the press. He did so at last night’s Marlins game. Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post has a detailed rundown of the interview. This was a the highlight for me. Loria was asked if he realizes fans hate him:

I have a sense of it. I’m sorry that we’ve built this amazing ballpark and fans are feeling the way they do but we did this for a reason – we weren’t going anywhere and I think anybody who is a baseball person will realize that after two years that we had, we had to do something. We had to do something quickly and swiftly and bold.

The phrase “… we’ve built this amazing ballpark and …” in between “I’m sorry” and “fans feeling the way we do” pretty much sums it up. He may have well just called everyone ingrates. Of course he left out the part where those fans (a) paid for the ballpark against their will; (b) were duped into “a whole new Marlins” thing, complete with all that new merchandise the team sold last year; and (c) were then treated to another talent liquidation.

Beyond that, Loria gives his side of the story regarding Jose Reyes’ claim that Loria told him to buy a house in Miami a couple of days before he was traded. He-said-he-said, I suppose.

He also notes that the Marlins will not be making a long term offer to Giancarlo Stanton this season. Which isn’t the most surprising thing in the world given that he’s not yet arbitration eligible. But since this is the Marlins and they’ll trade anyone at anytime, it leaves the door open for him to be traded.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.