Bobby Valentine: “I thought I did a hell of a job in Boston … Connie Mack wasn’t going to win with that team”

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Sacred Heart University held a press conference today introducing Bobby Valentine as its new athletic director, Jerry Spar of WEEI.com was there to witness it, and not surprisingly Valentine said a few things that I’m sure Red Sox fans will love.

Asked about the 93-loss, drama-filled season with the Red Sox that got him fired, Valentine replied:

I thought I did a hell of a job in Boston. I thought what had to be done there was done except for winning a pennant. But Connie Mack wasn’t going to win with that team. It’s six months of a 62-year life. It’s six months of a 42-year career in baseball. It’s a blip, a little spot on the radar, as far as I’m concerned.

I mean, what do you even say to that?

Asked if his getting the Sacred Heart University job was a “joke,” Valentine replied:

If it’s a joke, it’s an inside joke. I’m very serious about everything I do in my life. I deal with passion and commitment and I deal with excellence.

I sort of want to go back to high school, just so I can use “I deal with passion and commitment and I deal with excellence” as my yearbook quote.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.