The Braves will retire Chipper Jones’ number on June 28

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The Atlanta Braves have announced that they will retire Chipper Jones’ number 10 and induct him into the Braves Hall of Fame on June 28.  That’s a Friday night game against the Dbacks.

Number 10 will be the 10th number retired by the Braves, following Hank Aaron (44), Eddie Mathews (41), Dale Murphy (3), Phil Niekro (35), Warren Spahn (21), Greg Maddux (31), Tom Glavine (47), Bobby Cox (6) and John Smoltz (29). That’s eleven if you count Jackie Robinson. Twelve for the inevitable Jeff Francoeur ceremony.

Chipper is probably the Braves second best position player of all time, so that he’s getting this honor is no surprise. Indeed, the only surprising thing about this is that they didn’t schedule it for a game against the Mets, without whom this honor would still be possible, but nowhere near as fun. But if they did it for a Mets game I guess Chipper’s man Marteeeeen couldn’t be there to see it in person.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”