Lance Berkman to Ron Washington on 2011 World Series: “Yeah, we won that war”

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Lance Berkman usually says whatever he’s feeling and he’s one of the most interesting interview subjects in professional sports because of it.

But he probably crossed some sort of line in Rangers camp Tuesday. Drew Davison of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram has the story from Surprise, Arizona:

Berkman, who signed a one-year, $11 million deal with the Rangers in the off-season, didn’t miss an opportunity to fire the first shot about the 2011 season.

During the team’s annual meeting before the first full squad workout of spring training, manager Ron Washington spoke about the players in the clubhouse who had been through the “war” of a baseball season.

“He forgot about me and then he was like, ‘Berkman has been through the war too,’” Berkman said. “And I was like, ‘Yeah, we won that war.’”

Berkman’s Cardinals beat the Rangers in a wild seven-game series that featured one of the craziest postseason baseball games in the sport’s history. And the “Big Puma” played a huge part in capturing that championship for St. Louis. But he is with Texas now, and all the Rangers fans I’ve met despise rehashing the 2011 Fall Classic like they’ll probably despise Berkman’s use of “we” when referring to his former team.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.