Craig Kimbrel had a hole-in-one at a charity golf tournament

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Craig Kimbrel is the most dominant pitcher in baseball and he’s also apparently a pretty good golfer. Or at least good enough to sink a hole-in-one at the Chipper Jones/Tim Hudson charity tournament yesterday:

Mark Bowman of MLB.com has the details:

Kimbrel … used his four-iron to make quick work of the par-3 No. 2 hole on the National Course, striking the ball 203 yards into the wind and directly into the hole for his first-ever ace.

“I didn’t even know it was a hole-in-one at first,” a beaming Kimbrel said. “I thought it came up short and went into the sand.” …

His prize for this closest of “closest to the pin” measurements? “A box of golf balls,” he said proudly.

Once in junior high I was golfing with a few friends and we conspired to convince one of the guys in our group that he’d hit a hole-in-one, specifically so he would start bragging about it and then, months later, we could collectively tell him it was all fake. It turned out more sad than funny, really, but then again if we hadn’t done it what would I be writing at the end of this post right now? Everything happens for a reason!

Mostly, though, congratulations to Kimbrel on the box of golf balls.

Sean Manaea pitches first no-hitter of 2018

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea delivered his first career no-hitter against the Red Sox in a decisive 3-0 victory on Saturday night. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea was nearly flawless, holding the Sox to four total baserunners and striking out 10 of 30 batters faced — a career record.

Manaea was gifted a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth inning. While the Red Sox managed to draw two walks off of Manaea, they didn’t come anywhere close to plating a run. Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning with an infield hit down the first base line, but strayed out of bounds and later saw his hit reversed on a call of batter interference.

Entering the ninth inning, the 26-year-old lefty was sitting at just 95 pitches through eight frames of no-hit ball. He quickly deposed Blake Swihart and Mookie Betts with a groundout and fly out, then walked Benintendi on seven pitches. Any threat the Red Sox might have posed was soon eliminated, however, as Hanley Ramirez ground into a force out to complete the no-hitter.

Manaea is the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter was also against an AL West rival, when the Mariners’ Chris Bosio clinched a 2-0 no-no on April 22, 1993. Manaea’s feat is even more outstanding given how dominant the Red Sox have looked this season: prior to Saturday’s defeat, they boasted a 17-2 record and had yet to be shut out during the regular season.