Tom Ricketts is ready to move forward with Wrigley upgrades … if the city will

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We talked a few weeks ago about the Cubs’ new and improved (i.e. privately financed) Wrigley Field renovation plans. Tom Ricketts spoke to MLB.com and it sounds like they’re set to begin. They’re just waiting for city sign-off on the aspects of it that require approval, such as an increase in the number of night games, allowing advertising to block the rooftops across the street and allowing the closing of Sheffield Avenue for weekend games. About all that:

“There’s a lot of things we have to deal with at Wrigley Field that other teams don’t,” Ricketts said on Sunday. “Whether that’s signage restrictions, rooftops, other people selling Cubs gear right outside the park — all of that is great for [the city], but it doesn’t help us. We have to get those resources back into the team so I can give those to [president of baseball operations] Theo [Epstein] to put on the field or to get those resources into improving and preserving the third-largest tourist attraction in the state.”

With all of the time I spend slamming team owners for wanting public handouts, this point, with respect to the Cubs anyway, does get neglected from time to time.  I realize that the Cubs have gotten a lot of goodwill from the rooftops and the neighborhood and things like that — and I know that in recent years the team has even gone into business to some extent with the rooftop owners — but the Cubs are sort of treated like a public good more than other teams are.

What’s more, they’re expected — mostly out of tradition — to give away an awful lot. Views and ticket revenue to the people across the street, nighttime revenue to the bar and restaurant owners.  I don’t think that mandates public financing or anything, but I think it does make their challenges somewhat unique and demands a bit more flexibility on the part of the city so the team can remain competitive.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays in part of three-team deal

Tampa Bay Rays
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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post. MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert adds that the Rays will get two players to be named later from the D-Backs.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.